As your child’s immune system develops, the common cold, coughs and sore throats will most likely be frequent concerns.  While many of these illnesses can be prevented, use the resources below to learn about possible causes, symptoms and home treatments relating to your child’s illness. You can also check symptoms to see if you need to take your child to a pediatrician.

To schedule an appointment, please call 847.570.5020 or request an appointment online.

Abdominal Pain | Constipation | Coughs | Diarrhea | Ear Problems | Fever | Flu | Nausea and Vomiting | Pinkeye | Rash | Respiratory Problems | Sore Throats | Urinary Problems

Abdominal Pain

Abdominal pain, usually caused by changes in eating or bowel habits, is a common complaint for children. If the pain goes away completely in less than three hours and is not accompanied by other symptoms, it can often be cured without a trip to the pediatrician’s office. Severe or localized pain, which is pain located in one specific area, may be a symptom of a more serious condition.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Constipation

Constipation occurs when stools become hard or difficult to pass. While uncomfortable, constipation can usually be cured through home treatment and is often caused by changes in diet, not taking in enough fluids and certain medicines.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Coughs

Coughs in children and adults are a way for the body to rid itself of foreign material or mucus. The type of cough, whether or not it produces mucus, can reveal more about your child’s illness and its cause. For example, a dry cough may be a sign of allergies while a cough with mucus may be a sign of bronchitis. Depending on severity, your child may need to see a pediatrician for a prescription.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Diarrhea

Diarrhea occurs when there is an increase in the usual number of bowel movements or when bowel movements are more watery or loose. Sometimes caused by changes in your child’s diet, diarrhea may also be a symptom of an infection, such as the stomach flu. If your child has diarrhea, take immediate steps to make sure he or she does not become dehydrated.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Ear Problems

Ear pain in children may be a sign of an ear infection, which is the most commonly diagnosed bacterial infection for children younger than seven years old. Frequently, ear infections occur along with cold symptoms that have been present a few days. An injury, caused by a fall, loud noise or pressure change, can also result in ear pain.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Fever

Fever, or a body temperature of 99 or above, is a symptom of your child’s infection or illness. If your child has a fever, closely monitor other symptoms to determine the severity of your child’s illness. Take your child to visit his or her pediatrician for a fever lasting for three or more days.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Flu

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness with mild to severe symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headaches, fatigue, vomiting and diarrhea. Because children younger than five are at high risk for developing flu-related complications, you should have your child and yourself vaccinated for the flu each year as a part of routine immunizations. Please discuss any concerns about immunizations with your child’s pediatrician before deciding not to vaccinate your child.

To learn more about flu symptoms and vaccines, visit Flu Symptoms & Information »

Nausea and Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting in children is usually not serious and can be remedied with home treatment. A baby may vomit due to overfeeding, an intolerance to milk or formula, or if he or she is not burped after feeding. A stomach illness may also cause vomiting, although this symptom will usually stop within 12 hours.

If your child is vomiting because he or she has accidentally ingested medicine, cleaning supplies or other poisons, call the Illinois Poison Center at 1.800.222.1222 immediately. To prevent poisoning, safeguard your home before baby arrives.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Pinkeye

Highly contagious, pinkeye is a very common illness for children, which usually lasts from seven to ten days. Symptoms include eye redness, swollen eyelids, more tearing than usual, itching, drainage from the eye and mild light sensitivity. Allergies, infections, dry eyes and certain chemicals can cause pinkeye. Teach your children proper hand-washing (as long as it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice) to help prevent the spread of pinkeye in school or daycare settings.

Learn more about symptoms and home treatments for pinkeye »

Rash

Rashes, a redness of the skin or small bumps on the skin, can be caused by an allergic reaction, excessive heat, or a virus, such as the chickenpox. In most cases, a minor rash will clear up on its own with home treatment, but if the rash becomes more severe a visit to your child’s pediatrician may be needed.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Respiratory Problems

Many children and babies will suffer from respiratory problems a few times each year. Symptoms can include coughing, fever, a runny or stuffy nose, and trouble breathing. Viral and bacterial infections, allergies and asthma are common causes or respiratory problems. While mild viral infections will usually clear up in four to 10 days, asthma and allergies may need to be managed by medical treatment.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

Sore Throats

The painful irritation of a sore throat is often caused by the common cold or allergies; however, a more serious bacterial infection such as strep throat or tonsillitis will also produce a sore throat. Depending on the cause, your child’s sore throat may require medical treatment.

Learn more about symptoms and home treatments for sore throats »

Urinary Problems

Because of the size of their bladder, children will need to urinate frequently. You should not be concerned unless your child’s urine becomes more concentrated or darker, a sign of dehydration. If your child has pain when urinating or blood in their urine, this may be a sign of a urinary tract infection, which will need to be treated with antibiotics.

To check symptoms and to learn more about home treatment, visit the links below:

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