The Myra Rubenstein Weis Health Resource Center is dedicated to supporting the health education needs of the community. An annual benefit funds the Resource Center as well as the Living in the Future (LIFE) Cancer Survivorship Program, including sponsorship of the Myra Rubenstein Weis Cancer Survivorship Seminars.

Located at Highland Park Hospital, the Resource Center is a private place to obtain information when making healthcare decisions.

Visitors are welcome to stop by to browse our collection and enjoy our relaxing environment between appointments or during other idle time in the hospital.

Our personal, confidential assistance is available free of charge to help you find the health information you need. Our hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information or to request services, call the Resource Center Coordinator at 847.480.2727 or email

In the Spotlight: Breast Cancer:

While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same. We have made a lot of progress but still have a long way to go.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States (other than skin cancer), but millions of women are surviving the disease thanks in part to early detection and improvements in treatment.

Adult women of all ages are encouraged to perform breast self-exams at least once a month.

Approximately 40% of diagnosed breast cancers are detected by women who feel a lump, so establishing a regular breast self-exam is very important.

How should a breast self-exam be performed?

1) In the Shower 

Using the pads of your fingers, move around your entire breast in a circular pattern moving from the outside to the center, checking the entire breast and armpit area. Check both breasts each month feeling for any lump, thickening, or hardened knot. Notice any changes and get lumps evaluated by your healthcare provider.

2) In Front of a Mirror 

Visually inspect your breasts with your arms at your sides. Next, raise your arms high overhead.

Look for any changes in the contour, any swelling, or dimpling of the skin, or changes in the nipples. Next, rest your palms on your hips and press firmly to flex your chest muscles. Left and right breasts will not exactly match—few women's breasts do, so look for any dimpling, puckering, or changes, particularly on one side.

3) Lying Down

When lying down, the breast tissue spreads out evenly along the chest wall. Place a pillow under your right shoulder and your right arm behind your head. Using your left hand, move the pads of your fingers around your right breast gently in small circular motions covering the entire breast area and armpit.

Use light, medium, and firm pressure. Squeeze the nipple; check for discharge and lumps. Repeat these steps for your left breast.

While mammograms can help you to detect cancer before you can feel a lump, breast self-exams help you to be familiar with how your breasts look and feel so you can alert your healthcare professional if there are any changes.

Remember this formula: once a month self-exam + yearly mammogram could = saving your life!

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