Hip Replacement Surgery

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Normal hip joint

Normal hip joint
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slide 1 of 6, Normal hip joint,

Osteoarthritis of the hip

Hip joint affected by osteoarthritis
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slide 2 of 6, Osteoarthritis of the hip,

In osteoarthritis, the cartilage that protects and cushions the joints breaks down over time. As the cartilage wears down, the bone surfaces rub against each other. This damages the tissue and bone, which then causes pain. The joint space in this hip joint is narrowed due to cartilage loss and bone spur formation.

Damaged cartilage and bone are removed from hip socket and femur

Hip replacement: Step 1 - Damaged cartilage and bone are removed
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slide 3 of 6, Damaged cartilage and bone are removed from hip socket and femur,

Removal of cartilage from the hip socket (acetabulum) and removal of the upper end of the femur

Hip socket component is placed

Hip replacement: Step 2 - Hip socket component is placed
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slide 4 of 6, Hip socket component is placed,

Placement of acetabular component

Femoral component is placed

Hip replacement: Step 3 - Femoral component is placed
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slide 5 of 6, Femoral component is placed,

Placement of femoral component

Hip replacement is complete

Completed hip replacement
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slide 6 of 6, Hip replacement is complete,

Completed hip replacement

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAnne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerKenneth J. Koval, MD - Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic Trauma

Current as ofMay 22, 2015

Current as of: May 22, 2015

Author: Healthwise Staff

Medical Review: Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine & Kenneth J. Koval, MD - Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopedic Trauma