Ravi K. Bashyal, M.D.

Ravi K. Bashyal, M.D.

Ravi K. Bashyal, M.D.

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Personal Bio

Treatment Philosophy

My goal is to spend time with patients and help them understand their condition as well as possible treatment options. While I perform nearly 400 Minimally Invasive Hip and Knee Replacements every year, I usually also discuss other modalities such as physical therapy and injections (both cortisone and viscosupplementation or "gel" shots). Often, patients see me after they have exhausted these non-surgical options. Once the pain and stiffness have gotten to a point where quality of life is impacted, we will often discuss surgery. In addition to technical expertise and experience, I feel that education is key to obtaining excellent outcomes. I try to spend as much time as needed to make sure patients understand the procedure itself, and also what to expect afterwards in terms of recovery and return to activity. My staff and I strive to make the surgical process as efficient as possible, and do everything we can to ensure excellent outcomes for all our patients.

Personal Interests

My time away from the hospital and office is usually spent with my family. In addition, I am a FAA licensed private pilot and enjoy aviation. I also try to stay healthy by playing competitive basketball on a regular basis, and enjoy most athletic activities.

Conditions & Procedures

Conditions

Adult Hip Diseases, Anterior Knee Pain, Arthritis of the Knee, Hip Arthritis, Hip Injury, Hip Osteoarthritis, Knee Osteoarthritis, Osteoarthritis

Procedures

Anterior Hip Replacement, Computer Assisted Hip Surgery, Computer Assisted Knee Surgery, Custom Hip Replacement, Custom Knee Replacement, Hip Replacement, Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty, Knee Injections, Knee Replacement, Minimally Invasive Hip Techniques, Minimally Invasive Knee Techniques, Reconstructive Hip Surgery, Reconstructive Knee Surgery, Total Hip Replacement and Revision Surgery, Total Knee Replacement and Revision Surgery, Unicompartmental Knee Replacement

General Information

Gender

Male

Affiliation

NorthShore Medical Group

Expertise

Minimally Invasive Custom Hip and Knee Replacement

Academic Rank

Clinical Assistant Professor

Languages

English

Board Certified

Orthopaedic Surgery

Clinical Service

Education, Training & Fellowships

Medical School

University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 2005

Internship

Washington University School of Medicine, 2006

Residency

Washington University School of Medicine, 2010

Fellowship

Harvard Medical School - Massachusetts General Hospital, 2011

Locations

A

NorthShore Medical Group

9650 Gross Point Rd.
Suite 2900
Skokie, IL 60076
847.866.7846 224.251.2905 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
B

NOI NorthShore Orthopedics Chicago

680 N Lake Shore Dr
Ste 924
Chicago, IL 60611
847.866.7846 224.251.2905 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
C

NorthShore Medical Group

2150 Pfingsten Rd.
Suite 3000
Glenview, IL 60026
847.866.7846 224.251.2905 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.

Insurance

Commercial Plans
  • Aetna Choice POS (Open Access) and POS II (Open Access)
  • Aetna Elect Choice EPO and EPO Open Access
  • Aetna Health Network Options
  • Aetna HMO (including Open Access)
  • Aetna Managed Choice (Open Access)
  • Aetna Managed Choice POS
  • Aetna Open Access Aetna Select (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Access Elect Choice EPO (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Access Managed Choice POS (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Choice PPO
  • Aetna Open Choice PPO (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Premier Care Network
  • Aetna QPOS
  • Aetna Select
  • Aetna Select (Open Access)
  • Beechstreet PPO Network
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - PPO Products
    Not Contracted Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Choice PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Advantage
    Verify PCP Participation
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield HMOI
  • Cigna HMO
  • Cigna LocalPlus
  • Cigna Open Access Plus (OAP)
  • Cigna Open Access Plus with CareLink (OAPC)
  • Cigna POS
  • Cigna PPO
  • Cofinity PPO (an Aetna Company)
  • Coventry Health Care Elect Choice EPO
  • Coventry Health Care First Health PPO
  • Galaxy Health PPO Network
  • Great West PPO/POS
  • Healthcare's Finest Network (HFN)
  • Humana - All Commercial Plans (including Choice Care)
  • Humana - NorthShore Complete Care
  • Humana/ChoiceCare Network PPO
  • Medicare
  • Multiplan and PHCS PPO Network (Including PHCS Savility)
  • NorthShore Employee Network I (EPO)
  • NorthShore Employee Network II (EPO Plus & CDHP)
  • Preferred Plan PPO
  • Three Rivers Provider PPO Network (TRPN)
  • Tricare
  • Unicare
  • United Healthcare - All Commercial Plans
    Not Contracted United Healthcare Core
    Not Contracted United Healthcare Navigate
Exchange Plans
  • Not Contracted Aetna
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - PPO Products
    Not Contracted Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Choice PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Precision
    Verify PCP Participation
  • Not Contracted Coventry
  • Humana National
  • Land of Lincoln - All Products
  • Not Contracted United Healthcare Compass
Medicaid
  • Illinois Department of Public Aid (IDPA)
  • Illinicare ICP
  • Community Care Partners
Medicare Advantage Plans
  • Aetna Medicare (SM) Plan (HMO/Open Access HMO)
  • Aetna Medicare (SM) Plan (PPO)
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Medicare Advantage PPO Plan
    Effective 1/1/2015
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Advantage HMO
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Premier HMO-POS
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Primary HMO
  • Humana Gold Plus HMO
  • Humana Gold Plus PFFS
  • HumanaChoice PPO
  • United Healthcare - All Medicare Plans
Medicare Medicaid Alignment Initiative (MMAI) Plans
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Community
  • HealthSpring
  • Humana
  • Illinicare Health Plan
  • Meridian Complete

Publications

  • The Impact of Total Joint Arthroplasty on Sexual Function in Young, Active Patients.

    The Journal of arthroplasty 2014 Oct 2

    Authors: Nunley RM,
    Abstract
    There is limited information regarding sexual function following total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA). A multicenter study of 806 THA, 542 TKA, and 181 control patients less than 60 years of age was conducted using an independent survey center to question subjects about their sexual function. Only 1.3% of THA and 1.6% of TKA patients stated they were not sexually active due to their operation. No significant differences were noted in sexual function based on the bearing surface, femoral head size, or use of surface replacement arthroplasty in the hip cohort. Multivariate analysis revealed no difference in the percentage of patients sexually active following a THA or TKA (OR 1.19, P=0.38). Most young active patients return to sexual activity after hip and knee arthroplasty.
    PMID: 25449592 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Is administratively coded comorbidity and complication data in total joint arthroplasty valid?

    Clinical orthopaedics and related research 2013 Jan

    Authors: Bozic KJ,
    Abstract
    Administrative claims data are increasingly being used in public reporting of provider performance and health services research. However, the concordance between administrative claims data and the clinical record in lower extremity total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is unknown.
    We evaluated the concordance between administrative claims and the clinical record for 13 commonly reported comorbidities and complications in patients undergoing TJA.
    We compared 13 administratively coded comorbidities and complications derived from hospital billing records with clinical documentation from a consecutive series of 1350 primary and revision TJAs performed at three high-volume institutions during 2009.
    Concordance between administrative claims and the clinical record varied across comorbidities and complications. Concordance between diabetes and postoperative myocardial infarction was reflected by a kappa value > 0.80; chronic lung disease, coronary artery disease, and postoperative venous thromboembolic events by kappa values between 0.60 and 0.79; and for congestive heart failure, obesity, prior myocardial infarction, peripheral arterial disease, bleeding complications, history of venous thromboembolism, prosthetic-related complications, and postoperative renal failure by kappa values between 0.40 and 0.59. All comorbidities and complications had a high degree of specificity (> 92%) but lower sensitivity (29%-100%).
    The data suggest administratively coded comorbidities and complications correlate reasonably well with the clinical record. However, the specificity of administrative claims is much higher than the sensitivity, indicating that comorbidities and complications coded in the administrative record were accurate but often incomplete.
    PMID: 22528384 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Immobilization after pinning of supracondylar distal humerus fractures in children: use of the A-frame cast.

    Journal of pediatric orthopedics

    Authors: McKeon KE,
    Abstract
    Circumferential casts can contribute to elevated compartment pressures in the setting of acute swelling. We have developed a novel casting method (A-frame cast) that allows cast placement while leaving the antecubital fossa free of casting material. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and complications associated with acute placement of this definitive cast after closed reduction percutaneous pinning (CRPP) of acute supracondylar distal humerus fractures.
    A retrospective medical record reviewed 436 patients treated with CRPP of supracondylar fractures by 3 surgeons who routinely used an A-frame cast over a 12-year period. All complications or the need for cast modification were noted. Patients with open reduction, ipsilateral fractures, or patients lost to follow-up were excluded.
    There were 387 patients who met inclusion criteria, including 204 type 2 fractures and 183 type 3 fractures. Forty-three patients had preoperative nerve palsy and 1 had preoperative vascular injury. Of these 387 patients, 369 (95.3%) had an uneventful postoperative course. Nineteen patients (4.9%) required either cast splitting (15) or strict elevation (4) secondary to pain and swelling. Seven of these 19 patients had preoperative nerve palsy and 1 had preoperative vascular injury. The average time from procedure to cast splitting was 17.6 hours. No patients lost their reduction or required a second surgical procedure related to a complication from casting.
    An "A-frame" cast provides sturdy immobilization without increased risk of compartment syndrome after CRPP of supracondylar fractures in the pediatric population. Consideration should be given to splitting the cast prophylactically in patients with preoperative neurological or vascular deficits.
    IV-Case Series.
    PMID: 22173398 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the leg in children: diagnosis and outcome.

    The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume 2011 May 18

    Authors: Flynn JM,
    Abstract
    Currently, the most common clinical scenario for compartment syndrome in children is acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the leg. We studied the cause, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the leg in children.
    Forty-three cases of acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the leg in forty-two skeletally immature patients were collected from two large pediatric trauma centers over a seventeen-year period. All children with acute traumatic compartment syndrome underwent fasciotomy. The mechanism of injury, date and time of injury, time to diagnosis, compartment pressures, time to fasciotomy, and outcome at the time of the latest follow-up were recorded.
    Thirty-five (83%) of the forty-two patients were injured in a motor-vehicle accident and sustained tibial and fibular fractures. The average time from injury to fasciotomy was 20.5 hours (range, 3.9 to 118 hours). In general, the functional outcome was excellent at the time of the latest follow-up. No cases of infection were noted when fasciotomy was performed long after the injury. At the time of the latest follow-up, forty-one (95%) of forty-three cases were associated with no sequelae (such as pain, loss of function, or decreased sensation). The two patients who lost function had fasciotomy 82.5 and eighty-six hours after the injury.
    Despite a long period from injury to fasciotomy, most children who are managed for acute traumatic compartment syndrome of the leg have an excellent outcome. This delay may occur because acute traumatic compartment syndrome manifests itself more slowly in children or because the diagnosis is harder to establish in this age group. The results of the present study should raise awareness of late presentation and the importance of vigilance for developing compartment syndrome in the early days after injury. Fasciotomy during the acute swelling phase, even long after injury, produced excellent results with no cases of infection.
    PMID: 21593369 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Complications after pinning of supracondylar distal humerus fractures.

    Journal of pediatric orthopedics

    Authors: Bashyal RK,
    Abstract
    Supracondylar distal humerus fractures are one of the most common skeletal injuries in children. The current treatment of choice in North America is closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation. Often surgeons leave the pins exposed beneath a cast but outside the skin. Great variation exists with respect to preoperative skin preparation, and perioperative antibiotic administration. Few data exist regarding the rate of infection and other complications. The purpose of this study is to review a large series of children to evaluate the rate of infection and other complications.
    A retrospective review was carried out of all patients treated at our institution over an 11-year period. A total of 622 patients were identified that were followed for a minimum of 2 weeks after pin removal. Seventeen patients had flexion-type fractures, 294 had type II fractures, and 311 had type III fractures. Seventy-four fractures (11.9%) had preoperative nerve deficits with anterior interosseous palsies being the most common (33 fractures, 5.3%). Preoperative antibiotics were given to 163 patients (26.2%). Spray and towel draping were used in 362 patients, paint and towel draping were used in 65 patients, alcohol paint and towel draping were used in 146 patients, and a full preparation and draping were used in 13 patients. The pins were left exposed under the cast in 591 fractures (95%), and buried beneath the skin in 31 fractures (5.0%). A medial pin was placed in 311 fractures with a small incision made to aid placement in 18 of these cases.
    The most common complication was pin migration necessitating unexpected return to the operating room for pin removal in 11 patients (1.8%). One patient developed a deep infection with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis (0.2%). Five additional patients had superficial skin infections and were treated with oral antibiotics for a total infection rate of 6 of 622 patients (1.0%). One patient ultimately had a malunion and 4 others returned to the operating room for repeat reduction and pinning. Three patients developed compartment syndromes. Ulnar nerve injury was rare with only 1 postoperative ulnar nerve injury occurring in 311 patients treated with a medial pin (0.3%).
    Closed reduction with percutaneous pinning is effective and has a low complication rate with a very low rate of infection even when simple betadine preparation and towel draping are used. Preoperative antibiotics seem to have little effect on infection rate.
    Level III retrospective comparative study.
    PMID: 20104149 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Jul 2014

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