Patrick Michael Birmingham, M.D.

Patrick Michael Birmingham, M.D.

Patrick Michael Birmingham, M.D.

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Personal Bio

Treatment Philosophy

I strive to treat each patient based on their individual personal goals, and return them to activity and life style as quickly as possible.

Conditions & Procedures

Conditions

Elbow Injury, Femoralacetabular Impingement, Hip Labral Tear, Knee Injury, Shoulder Dislocation, Shoulder Injury, Shoulder/Rotator Cuff

Procedures

ACL Reconstruction, Arthroscopy, Cartilage Restoration, Hip Arthroscopy, Knee Arthroscopy, Rotator Cuff Repair, Shoulder Arthroscopic Care, Shoulder Replacement

General Information

Gender

Male

Affiliation

NorthShore Medical Group

Expertise

ACL Tears, Rotator Cuff Tears, Hip Labral Tears

Academic Rank

Clinician Educator

Languages

English

Board Certified

Orthopaedic Surgery, Sports Medicine

Clinical Service

Sports Medicine

Education, Training & Fellowships

Medical School

Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, 2003

Internship

George Washington University Medical Center, 2004

Residency

George Washington University Medical Center, 2008

Fellowship

Hospital for Special Surgery, 2009

Locations

A

NOI NorthShore Orthopedics Chicago

680 N Lake Shore Dr
Ste 924
Chicago, IL 60611
847.866.7846 866.954.5787 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
B

NorthShore Medical Group

225 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Vernon Hills, IL 60061
847.866.7846 866.954.5787 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
C

NorthShore Medical Group

15 Tower Ct.
Suite 300
Gurnee, IL 60031
847.866.7846 866.954.5787 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
D

NOI NorthShore Orthopedics Glenview

2501 Compass Rd
Ste 125
Glenview, IL 60026
847.866.7846 866.954.5787 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
E

NorthShore Medical Group

9650 Gross Point Rd.
Suite 2900
Skokie, IL 60076
847.866.7846 866.954.5787 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.

Insurance

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this directory. However, some changes may occur between updates. Please check with your provider to ensure that he or she participates in your health plan.

Aetna HMO/PPO/POS
BCBS HMOI
BCBS PPO *except Blue Choice IL
Beechstreet PPO
CCN PPO
CIGNA Choice Fund
CIGNA Choice Fund PPO
CIGNA EPO
CIGNA Network
CIGNA Network Open Access
CIGNA POS
CIGNA POS Open Access
CIGNA PPO
CIGNA:Open Access Plus
First Health PPO
Galaxy PPO
Great West POS
Great West PPO
Healthcares Finest Network PPO
Humana Choice Care PPO
Humana IPA--HMO
Humana POS
Humana PPO
Land of Lincoln
Medicare
Multiplan Admar PPO
Multiplan Formost PPO
Multiplan Health Network PPO
Multiplan Wellmark PPO
NorthShore Employee Network I (EPO Option)
NorthShore Employee Network II (EPO Plus & CDHP)
PHCS PPO
Preferred Plan PPO
Railroad Medicare - Cook County
Railroad Medicare - Lake County
UHC *except Core & Navigate
Unicare PPO

Publications

  • The effect of dynamic femoroacetabular impingement on pubic symphysis motion: a cadaveric study.

    The American journal of sports medicine 2012 May

    Authors: Birmingham PM,
    Abstract
    A link between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been reported clinically. One proposed origin of athletic pubalgia is secondary to repetitive loading of the pubic symphysis, leading to instability and parasymphyseal tendon and ligament injury. Hypothesis/
    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of simulated femoral-based femoroacetabular impingement on rotational motion at the pubic symphysis. The authors hypothesize that the presence of a cam lesion leads to increased relative symphyseal motion.
    Controlled laboratory study.
    Twelve hips from 6 fresh-frozen human cadaveric pelvises were used to simulate cam-type femoroacetabular impingement. The hips were held in a custom jig and maximally internally rotated at 90° of flexion and neutral adduction. Three-dimensional motion of the pubic symphysis was measured by a motion-tracking system for 2 states: native and simulated cam. Load-displacement plots were generated between the internal rotational torque applied to the hip and the responding motion in 3 anatomic planes of the pubic symphysis.
    As the hip was internally rotated, the motion at the pubic symphysis increased proportionally with the degrees of the rotation as well as the applied torque measured at the distal femur for both states. The primary rotation of the symphysis was in the transverse plane and on average accounted for more than 60% of the total rotation. This primary motion caused the anterior aspect of the symphyseal joint to open or widen, whereas the posterior aspect narrowed. At the torque level of 18.0 N·m, the mean transverse rotation in degrees was 0.89° ± 0.35° for the native state and 1.20° ± 0.41° for cam state. The difference between cam and the native groups was statistically significant (P < .03).
    Dynamic femoroacetabular impingement as caused by the presence of a cam lesion causes increased rotational motion at the pubic symphysis.
    Repetitive loading of the symphysis by cam impingement is thought to lead to increased symphyseal motion, which is one possible precursor to athletic pubalgia.
    PMID: 22392561 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Functional outcome after repair of proximal hamstring avulsions.

    The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume 2011 Oct 5

    Authors: Birmingham P,
    Abstract
    Rupture of the proximal origin of the hamstrings leads to pain, weakness, and a debilitating decrease in physical activity. Repair of these injuries should be based on the expectation that these deficits can be addressed. The goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the efficacy of repair of proximal hamstring avulsions.
    Thirty-four patients were identified retrospectively to have a complete rupture of the proximal origin of the hamstrings based on the presence of a bowstring sign and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Patients were contacted for follow-up evaluation to fill out a subjective questionnaire, to undergo functional testing, and to undergo isokinetic testing on a Cybex dynamometer. Twenty-three patients were evaluated.
    There were nine acute and fourteen chronic repairs, and the average period of follow-up was 43.3 months. Twenty-one of twenty-three patients reported returning to activity at an average of 95% of their pre-injury activity level at an average of 9.8 months. Eighteen patients reported excellent results; four, good results; and one, fair results. Hamstring strength was an average of 93% and 90% of that in the uninvolved limb at 240° per second and 180° per second, respectively. The hamstrings-to-quadriceps ratio was 56% for 240° per second and 48% at 180° per second. Hamstring endurance was an average of 81% and 91% of the nonoperative limb at 240° per second and 180° per second, respectively. Postoperative quadriceps strength and endurance were positively correlated with return to pre-injury level of activity (r = 0.6, p < 0.05; and r = 0.6, p < 0.05) and negatively correlated with time to return to sport (r = -0.5, p < 0.05; and r = -0.5, p < 0.05). There was no significant effect associated with age or time from injury.
    Repair of a symptomatic and displaced ruptured proximal hamstring tendon yields good subjective and objective functional results with minimal complications. Overall, patients are satisfied with surgical repair and experience return of functional activity with minimal postoperative weakness.
    PMID: 22005868 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Outcome of latissimus dorsi transfer as a salvage procedure for failed rotator cuff repair with loss of elevation.

    Journal of shoulder and elbow surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et al.]

    Authors: Birmingham PM,
    Abstract
    Eighteen patients, referred from an outside institution with massive, irreparable rotator cuff tears and loss of elevation, were treated with a latissimus dorsi tendon transfer as a salvage procedure for failed, prior, attempted rotator cuff repair. Clinical outcomes were measured by the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's (ASES) score, pain level, and active range of motion. The average postoperative ASES score was 61, an increase from 43 pre-operatively (P = .05). Active elevation improved to an average of 137 degrees compared to 56 degrees pre-operatively (P < .001). The average post-operative pain level was 22 mm, down from 59 (P = .001), and the average post-operative active external rotation at the side was 45 degrees, improved from 31 degrees (P < .001). We conclude that latissimus transfer, as a salvage procedure for failed rotator cuff repair with loss of elevation, allows for significant return of active elevation and function with minimal post-operative pain.
    PMID: 18760633 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Simulated joint infection assessment by rapid detection of live bacteria with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.

    The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume 2008 Mar

    Authors: Birmingham P,
    Abstract
    Although microbiological bacterial culture is currently considered the gold standard for diagnosis of septic arthritis, many studies have documented substantial false-negative and false-positive rates. The objective of this study was to determine whether real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction can be used to detect bacterial messenger RNA (mRNA) in synovial fluid as a way to distinguish live and dead bacteria as an indicator of active infection.
    Synovial fluid samples were obtained from twelve consecutive patients who presented with knee pain and effusion but no evidence of infection. Following assurance of sterility with plate cultures, each sample was inoculated with clinically relevant bacteria and incubated for twenty-four hours to simulate septic arthritis. Bacterial viability and load were assessed with cultures. Selected samples were also treated with a single dose of a combination of two antibiotics, vancomycin and gentamicin, and sampled at several time points. Total RNA isolated from each sample was analyzed in triplicate with one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to detect mRNA encoding for the genes groEL or femC. Controls included sterile, uninoculated samples and inoculated samples analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction without reverse transcription. mRNA content was estimated on the basis of detection limits as a function of serial dilutions and was expressed as a function of colony number in bacterial cultures and RNA content as determined spectrophotometrically.
    All synovial fluid samples that had been inoculated with one of the four bacterial species, and analyzed in triplicate, were identified (distinguished from aseptic synovial fluid) with real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; there were no false-negative results. All inoculated samples produced bacterial colonies on culture plates, while cultures of the aseptic samples were negative for growth. The detection limit of the one-step bacterial mRNA-based real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction varied depending on the bacterial species. A time-dependent decrease in the concentration of detectable bacterial mRNA was seen after incubation of bacteria with antibiotics.
    The direct quantification of the concentration of viable bacterial mRNA with real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction allows identification of both culture-positive bacterial infection and so-called unculturable bacterial infection in a simulated septic arthritis model. In contrast to conventional polymerase chain reaction, real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction minimizes false-positive detection of nonviable bacteria and thus provides relevant information on the success or failure of antibiotic therapy.
    PMID: 18310711 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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