Eugene F. Yen, M.D.

Eugene F. Yen, M.D.

Eugene F. Yen, M.D.

Log into NorthShoreConnect

Profile

Personal Bio

Treatment Philosophy

I have specialty training in colon cancer prevention and the management of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. I am currently researching microscopic colitis and early detection of colon cancer. I lead an active research team and am also involved in clinical trials for ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. I pride myself on being readily accessible to accommodate the needs of my patients, and am involved in educating my peers as well as patients on the complex nature of IBD.

Conditions & Procedures

Conditions

Celiac Disease, Colitis, Collagenous Colitis, Colon Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Crohn's Disease, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), Lymphocytic Colitis, Microscopic Colitis, Pregnancy and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Ulcerative Colitis

Procedures

Barryx, Bravo Placement, Chromoendoscopy, Colonoscopy, Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy, Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with sphinterotomy and/or stent placement, Esophageal Stent Placement, Flexible Sigmoidoscopy, Radiofrequency Ablation, Small Bowel Enteroscopy, Tumor Ablation, Upper Endoscopy

General Information

Gender

Male

Affiliation

NorthShore Medical Group

Expertise

Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Microscopic Colitis

Academic Rank

Clinical Assistant Professor

Languages

English

Board Certified

Gastroenterology, Internal Medicine

Clinical Service

Gastroenterology

Education, Training & Fellowships

Medical School

Tufts University, School of Medicine, 2001

Internship

Barnes-Jewish Hospital, 2002

Residency

Barnes-Jewish Hospital, 2004

Fellowship

University of California San Francisco, 2007

Locations

A

NorthShore Medical Group

1000 Central St.
Suite 615
Evanston, IL 60201
847.657.1900 847.733.5041 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
B

NorthShore Medical Group

2150 Pfingsten Rd.
Suite 3000
Glenview, IL 60026
847.657.1900 847.570.5041 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.

Insurance

Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this directory. However, some changes may occur between updates. Please check with your provider to ensure that he or she participates in your health plan.

Aetna HMO/PPO/POS
BCBS HMOI
BCBS PPO *except Blue Choice IL
Beechstreet PPO
CCN PPO
CIGNA Choice Fund
CIGNA Choice Fund PPO
CIGNA EPO
CIGNA Network
CIGNA Network Open Access
CIGNA POS
CIGNA POS Open Access
CIGNA PPO
CIGNA:Open Access Plus
First Health PPO
Galaxy PPO
Great West POS
Great West PPO
Healthcares Finest Network PPO
Humana Choice Care PPO
Humana IPA--HMO
Humana POS
Humana PPO
Land of Lincoln
Medicare
Multiplan Admar PPO
Multiplan Formost PPO
Multiplan Health Network PPO
Multiplan Wellmark PPO
NorthShore Employee Network I (EPO Option)
NorthShore Employee Network II (EPO Plus & CDHP)
PHCS PPO
Preferred Plan PPO
Railroad Medicare - Cook County
UHC *except Core & Navigate
Unicare PPO

Publications

  • Non-IBD colitides (eosinophilic, microscopic).

    Best practice & research. Clinical gastroenterology 2012 Oct

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Microscopic colitis includes the terms lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis, and is a common cause of chronic diarrhoea in older adults. The incidence of microscopic colitis has increased over time and has reached levels comparable to other forms of inflammatory bowel disease. In this chapter, an updated review on the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of microscopic colitis has been provided. There is limited data available about eosinophilic colitis, which is the least common of the eosinophilic GI disorders. It is important to rule out the secondary causes of colonic eosinophilia in patients with suspected eosinophilic colitis.
    PMID: 23384806 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Current and past cigarette smoking significantly increase risk for microscopic colitis.

    Inflammatory bowel diseases 2012 Oct

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Cigarette smoking is an important environmental factor affecting inflammatory bowel disease. The role of smoking has not been rigorously studied in microscopic colitis (MC). The aim of this study was to compare the association of cigarette smoking in individuals with MC compared to a control population without MC.
    We reviewed the records of patients with a clinical and histologic diagnosis of collagenous colitis (CC) or lymphocytic colitis (LC). Clinical history, including alcohol and smoking status at the time of diagnosis of MC, were reviewed. In this case-control study, age- and gender-matched patients without diarrhea presenting for outpatient colonoscopy served as the control population.
    We analyzed a total of 340 patients with MC: 124 with CC and 216 with LC. Overall, any smoking status (former or current) was associated with MC (odds ratio [OR] 2.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-2.88). This risk was more prominent in current smokers (adjusted OR 5.36, 3.81, and 4.37 for CC, LC, and all MC, respectively, 95% CI all greater than 1). The association of smoking was not significantly affected by gender or average alcohol consumption.
    In our study population, cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the development of both forms of microscopic colitis. There were no significant differences between LC and CC, and current smoking and the development of microscopic colitis affected men and women similarly. We feel that these data are sufficient to discuss the potential risks of tobacco use in patients with microscopic colitis.
    PMID: 22147506 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Decreased colorectal cancer and adenoma risk in patients with microscopic colitis.

    Digestive diseases and sciences 2012 Jan

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Microscopic colitis is currently considered to harbor no increased risk for colorectal cancer, based on a few small studies with limited long-term follow-up. Our aim was to identify patients with microscopic colitis, and to compare long-term rates of colorectal cancer or adenoma to a control group of patients without microscopic colitis.
    We reviewed the records of patients diagnosed with microscopic colitis, as identified by a hospital-based pathology database from January 2000 to August 2008. Clinical factors, including history of adenoma or adenocarcinoma, and all colonoscopy findings, were recorded. Age and gender-matched patients without microscopic colitis served as the control in a 1:1 fashion.
    A total of 647 patients (153 male: 494 female) were identified with microscopic colitis (MC). Any history of colorectal cancer was detected in 1.92, 1.81, and 4.17% of patients with collagenous colitis (CC), lymphocytic colitis (LC), and controls, respectively (P = 0.095, P = 0.040, P = 0.015 for CC, LC, and all MC, respectively, comparing to controls). Overall, covariate-adjusted risk (odds ratio) of any history of colorectal cancer and colorectal adenoma in MC patients was 0.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.16-0.73, P = 0.006) and 0.52 (95% CI 0.50-0.76, P < 0.0001), respectively. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.63 years, with 147/647 (22.7%) of patients with clinical follow-up >7 years.
    In this case-control study involving a large retrospective cohort, microscopic colitis is negatively associated with the risk for colorectal cancer and adenoma. Further studies are required to determine a temporal relationship between microscopic colitis and the future development of colorectal neoplasia.
    PMID: 21847567 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Review of the microscopic colitides.

    Current gastroenterology reports 2011 Oct

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Microscopic colitis is a common cause of chronic diarrhea in predominantly older adults. Incidence rates of microscopic colitis (including lymphocytic and collagenous colitis) have increased over time to levels comparable to other forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The possibility of drug-induced microscopic colitis is an important consideration when evaluating these patients, although this concept requires further investigation. There are few controlled treatment trials in microscopic colitis, with much of the data on treatment coming from retrospective studies. In patients with microscopic colitis, a systematic approach to therapy often leads to satisfactory control of symptoms. In this review, we will provide an updated assessment of the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of microscopic colitis.
    PMID: 21773709 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Review article: Microscopic colitis--lymphocytic, collagenous and 'mast cell' colitis.

    Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics 2011 Jul

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Microscopic colitis is a relatively common cause of chronic diarrhoea in predominantly older adults, traditionally termed lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. Increased mast cells found in the colonic biopsies of some patients with chronic diarrhoea may represent a distinct type of microscopic colitis.
    To provide an updated review of the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of microscopic colitis, and to discuss the role of mast cells in the gastrointestinal tract and their potential role in cases of functional diarrhoea.
    A MEDLINE literature search was performed to identify pertinent articles. Relevant clinical abstracts were also reviewed.
    Incidence rates of microscopic colitis (lymphocytic and collagenous colitis) have increased over time, to levels comparable with other forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The possibility of drug-induced microscopic colitis and concomitant coeliac sprue are important considerations when evaluating these patients. There are few controlled treatment trials in microscopic colitis, with much of the data on treatment coming from retrospective studies. Mast cells have been implicated in functional bowel disorders, with increased mast cells possibly contributing to cases of otherwise unexplained chronic diarrhoea, although this concept requires further investigation.
    In patients with microscopic colitis, a systematic approach to therapy often leads to satisfactory control of symptoms. The role of mast cells in chronic diarrhoea represents an evolving field, with the potential to offer alternative treatment pathways in patients with otherwise unexplained functional diarrhoea.
    PMID: 21545473 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Cost-effectiveness of 5-aminosalicylic acid therapy for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis.

    The American journal of gastroenterology 2008 Dec

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA, mesalamine) is effective in inducing and maintaining remission in ulcerative colitis (UC). The relative benefits and costs of maintenance 5-ASA therapy are uncertain. Our aims were to evaluate this strategy's potential cost-effectiveness.
    We constructed a Markov model to compare two strategies over 2 yr: (a) no maintenance 5-ASA, with 5-ASA 4.8 g/day given for flares, (b) maintenance 5-ASA 2.4 g/day, escalated and maintained at 4.8 g/day after the first flare. In both arms, the failure to induce remission led to other treatments, as needed: prednisone, parenteral corticosteroids, cyclosporine, 6-mercaptopurine, infliximab, and colectomy.
    Without maintenance 5-ASA, the mean flares per person were 1.92, and the mean cost per person was $3,402. With maintenance 5-ASA providing a relative risk of flare of 0.7 at 5-ASA cost of $198/month, flares per person decreased to 1.38 at a cost of $8,810/flare prevented. Maintenance 5-ASA increased discounted quality-adjusted life-years per person (QALYs per person) from 1.75 to 1.77 at a discounted cost of $224,000/QALY gained. The results were most sensitive to the flare risk reduction and cost of 5-ASA, the utilities of being in remission without or with 5-ASA, and the colectomy rates. At $15/month (the cost of sulfasalazine), maintenance 5-ASA cost $640/flare prevented and $16,300/QALY gained.
    Maintenance 5-ASA therapy decreases UC flares, but its cost may be substantial, depending on society's willingness to pay. If sulfasalazine can be tolerated and yields comparable benefits, sulfasalazine maintenance therapy is likely to be cost-effective. The cost per QALY gained by 5-ASA maintenance is highly dependent on the quality of life while taking versus not taking maintenance 5-ASA, highlighting the importance of patients' preferences.
    PMID: 18775007 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Colonoscopic treatment of acute diverticular hemorrhage using endoclips.

    Digestive diseases and sciences 2008 Sep

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Although colonoscopy is used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with diverticular hemorrhage, data on colonoscopic treatment outcomes are limited. We reviewed records of inpatients undergoing colonoscopy to identify patients that were colonoscopically diagnosed and treated for acute diverticular hemorrhage. Eleven patients with acute diverticular hemorrhage had active bleeding (n = 7) or non-bleeding visible vessel (n = 4) at colonoscopy. Endoclip treatment (preceded by epinephrine injection in 64%) achieved hemostasis in all patients without procedural complications. Patients were discharged within three days without evidence of early rebleeding. During a median follow-up of 15 months, late recurrent bleeding occurred in two patients (18.2%). Colonoscopic treatment of patients with acute diverticular hemorrhage using endoclips appears to be effective and safe, with high rates of immediate and long-term success. Colonoscopy should be considered in patients with suspected acute diverticular hemorrhage, as it may enable definitive therapy without the need for more invasive treatment.
    PMID: 18157637 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Cost-effectiveness of extending Medicare coverage of immunosuppressive medications to the life of a kidney transplant.

    American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons 2004 Oct

    Authors: Yen EF,
    Abstract
    Unless they maintain Medicare status through disability or age, kidney transplant recipients lose their Medicare coverage of immunosuppression 3 years after transplantation. A significant transplant survival advantage has previously been demonstrated by the extension of Medicare immunosuppressive medication coverage from 1 year to 3 years, which occurred between 1993 and 1995. The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) was analyzed for recipients of kidney transplants from 1995 to 1999. Using a Markov model, we estimated survival and costs of the current system of 3-year coverage compared with lifetime immunosuppression coverage. Results were calculated from the perspectives of society and Medicare. Extension of immunosuppression coverage produced an expected improvement from 38.6% to 47.6% in graft survival and from 55.4% to 61.8% in patient survival. The annualized expected savings to society from lifetime coverage was $136 million assuming current rates of transplantation. Medicare would break-even compared with current coverage if the fraction of patients using extended coverage was <32%. The extension would be cost-effective to Medicare if this fraction was <91%. Extended Medicare immunosuppression coverage to the life of a kidney transplant should result in better transplant and economic outcomes, and should be considered by policy makers.
    PMID: 15367228 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Social Media

× Alternate Text