From Crib to Bed: Ensuring a Smooth Transition

Friday, December 12, 2014 3:04 PM comments (0)

cribThere is no magic age for when it’s best to transition your toddler from a crib to the “big-kid” bed. Much of the timing depends on your child’s readiness as well the need to free up the crib for a new little brother or sister. In most cases, toddlers transition to a bed between the ages of 18 months to 3 years.

Whether you are mid-transition or only in the planning stages, Susan Roth, MD, Pediatrician at NorthShore, offers helpful tips to make the change a smoother one:

  • Maintain consistency with a bedtime routine. A big-kid bed shouldn’t mean a new bedtime hour or a different routine. Keep the bed the only significant change. Also, try to put your child’s new bed in the same place as the crib.
  • Make it fun! Get your child involved with this “big girl”/“big boy” step. For instance, let him or her choose new sheets for the bed. If you will be purchasing a new bed, let your child help out with this decision as well.
  • Start with naps. Make the new bed the naptime bed to start. If your child can’t manage to stay in his or her bed for the duration of an afternoon nap, it might be too early to make the transition. 
  • Keep safety in mind. Depending on the type of bed that you select, be sure that you are providing a safe sleeping environment for your toddler. If you transition straight to a twin bed, it may be best to place the mattress on the floor for a while. If this isn’t an option, consider installing guard rails so your child does not roll out of bed. Padding the floor with blankets and/or pillows can also help reduce the chance of injury.

    This is also a good time to rethink and revisit your overall household childproofing. Now that your child may get out of bed and walk around at night consider removing or safety-proofing other household hazards. If needed, consider installing a gate in your child’s doorway so he or she cannot exit the bedroom. This may be especially important in homes with an accessible staircase.
  • Be supportive, yet firm. Your toddler may not adjust to this new bed immediately. The newfound freedom may lead to him or her getting up more frequently or even trying to get out of bed. Try to stay calm and reinforce that it’s time for sleeping. 
  • Reward positive behavior. Don’t expect this transition to be without its hiccups. Be sure to positively reinforce a job well done throughout this transition period.

Have questions about transitioning your toddler from a crib to a bed? Join NorthShore's new online community, The Parent 'Hood, to ask and answer questions as well as connect with our team of medical experts. Check it out here

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The Great and Safe Outdoors: Summer Health and Safety Tips [Infographic]

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 2:57 PM comments (0)

Those sunny skies and warmer temperatures can mean only one thing: summer.  Before you head outside, it’s important to take some precautions to keep the entire family safe and healthy all season long.  From grilling and sun safety to beachside swimming and bug bite prevention, NorthShore University HealthSystem has the entire family covered with our summer safety tips infographic.

Click on the image below for the all the summer health tips you’ll need to take you to Labor Day and beyond.

outdoor safety

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Childhood Vaccines: Myths, Misconceptions and the Important Health Benefits

Wednesday, April 30, 2014 11:23 AM comments (0)

vaccinated babyWith so much conflicting information circling Internet about vaccines and whether they are safe or unsafe for children, especially via social media and blogs, Leslie Deitch Noble, MD, Pediatrician at NorthShore, reminds us why childhood vaccines are so important and addresses some of the common myths and misconceptions that parents encounter online:

“I love being a general pediatrician because of the unique privilege I have of getting to know families in a meaningful way and seeing the children in those families grow up over weeks, months and years. There is no greater reward than helping a child become and then stay happy and healthy. To that end, it is my goal to not only treat a child’s illness and address immediate problems, but, more importantly, to prevent illness whenever possible. That’s why I’m so passionate about immunization for my patients and my own loved ones.” 

Should I have my child vaccinated? Why?
Yes.
The simple answer: to prevent your child from contracting life-threatening illnesses. Vaccines have been incredibly successful at reducing the prevalence of diseases like polio, measles, whooping cough, meningitis and chicken pox, but these diseases have not been completely eradicated, especially in other parts of the world. We live in a global society, and thanks in part to lapses in vaccine rates throughout the U.S., we are seeing a resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases in our country. The ability of vaccination to reduce the incidence of disease depends on herd immunity, meaning the vaccination of a significant portion of the population. So, if children are vaccinated, that provides protection for everyone in the community, including those receiving chemotherapy for cancer who are unable to receive the inoculations themselves.  

Vaccination Schedule for Infants & Children 

  • Birth: HBV (Hepatitis B)
  • 1-2 months: HBV second dose
  • 2 months: DTaP (Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis), Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b), IPV (Inactivated poliovirus), PCV (Pneumoccoccal conjugate), Rota (Rotavirus)
  • 4 months: DTaP, Hib, IPV, PCV, Rota
  • 6 months: DTap, Hib, PCV, Rota
  • 6 months and annually: Influenza
  • 6-18 months: HBV, IPV
  • 12-15 months: Hib, MMR (Measles, mumps, rubella), PCV, Chickenpox
  • 15-18 months: DTaP
  • 4-6 years: DTaP, MMR, IPV, Varicella
  • 11-12 years: HPV, Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria pertussis booster), Meningococcal vaccine and then a booster at 16

Do vaccines cause autism?
No. Vaccines, especially the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine, were inaccurately linked to the rise in autism rates. This claim, which grew from Andrew Wakefield’s small (only 12 subjects) and now discredited 1998 case report, has been disproven in large-scale studies.

Another reason that MMR may have been linked to autism is due to the timing of the vaccine, which is administered between 12 and 15 months of age. Autism also begins to present itself around 12 months when affected children do not meet social and language skills milestones.  But it has been proven repeatedly in large-scale studies that there is no link between vaccines, including the MMR, and autism.  

Are vaccines “too much” for children’s immune systems?
No.
Our immune systems, including those of babies and children, are exposed to tens of thousands of foreign substances (i.e., antigens) every single day, which is significantly higher (1000-fold) than what children are exposed to in a vaccine. Administering multiple vaccines at the same appointment is both safe and effective. Combining vaccines into one visit also leads to fewer appointments and, more importantly, fewer tears.

Are preservatives in vaccines harmful?
No.
Preservatives (the purpose of which are to keep vaccines hygienic and free from bacteria) and stabilizers in vaccines have also been proven in many large, controlled studies to cause no harm.  Babies are exposed to larger amounts of preservatives in their natural environment, including preservatives transferred from mother to baby in breast milk.

What about “alternative”, “slow”, or “delayed” vaccine schedules?
No. The medical community (The Centers for Disease Control, The American Academy of Pediatrics, The Institute of Medicine, The American Medical Association) advocates following the Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons 0-6. This schedule has been specifically designed, researched, and tested to be the safest and most effective way to immunize children. Deviation from this schedule leaves children vulnerable to vaccine-preventable diseases and illnesses like whooping cough, meningitis, measles and more, all of which can be life-threatening. 

Where can I go to read reliable information about vaccines? Your child’s pediatrician is the best person to come to with any questions, concerns or the recommended schedule of vaccinations. The following are links to reputable organizations and studies for more information:

  1. Summaries of numerous studies on vaccine safety, including those referenced in this post.
  2. The CDC on Basics and Common Questions   
  3. Every Child By Two
  4. VaccinateYourBaby.org
  5. The American Academy of Pediatrics’ parent website
  6. AutismSpeaks.org

 

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Guide to Buying and Giving Age-Appropriate Toys

Thursday, December 06, 2012 5:37 PM comments (0)

Now is the time when our shopping lists for holiday giving may include items for children of varying ages. While walking through the aisles, you’ll see plenty of new toys along with many of the tried-and-true classics (like building blocks and dolls). With all the options out there, how do you know which toys are best suited for what ages?

The most colorful or cute toy on the shelf doesn’t always make it the best choice. It’s worthwhile to recognize that children of varying ages have achieved different development milestones.  Just as you wouldn’t give an infant a LEGO® set, you also wouldn’t buy a four year old a teething rattle.

Kenneth Fox, MD, a pediatrician at NorthShore, gives the following recommendations when shopping for age-appropriate toys:

  • Safety first. Choose sturdy toys with washable surfaces. Watch out for small parts, sharp points or edges. Make sure attached pieces (eyes, buttons, etc.) cannot be torn or bitten off to create choking hazards. Avoid toys made of or decorated with toxic substances or chemicals (paints, dyes, glazes or other embellishments). As much as possible, try to understand where toys or other gifts are made and avoid untrustworthy sources even if they appear to be bargains. Make certain batteries are not accessible to curious and nimble little hands and mouths. Battery- or electric-powered toys should be  labeled “UL approved.” For more detailed information on specific toys consult Consumer Protection Safety Commission website (www.CPSC.gov).
  • Read the packaging information. Most toys include a recommended age on the packaging. These labels, based on a typical child’s abilities and skills at a particular age, should serve as guidelines. But remember, every child is different and develops at his own pace. Ask yourself the basic question: “Is this toy right for this particular child, given his particular developmental stage?”
  • Resist buying toys that a child can “grow into”. Age guidelines on toys exist for a reason. As nice as it may be to stock up on new toys for the growing child, it’s often hard to keep these toys out of reach until they are age appropriate.
  • Choose usefulness over fad, “must-have” toys. Every year there are countless new toy trends and gimmicks. It often is best to stick to options that have been around long enough to be dependable and tested. The best, most fun toys often have an unstructured aspect. They invite and engage the child’s imagination and creativity.
  • Kids learn a lot both by receiving and by giving. Basic capacities for empathy emerge in childhood through experiences with gift exchange and through symbolic play. Kids learn to be generous givers and gracious receivers of gifts through practice, guided by caring adults. From choosing, wrapping and presenting gifts to others, a capacity for empathy is nurtured, supported and reinforced. Also, modeling how to show one’s appreciation is a great gift in itself. “Thank you” goes a long way, even in today’s world of rampant consumerism.
  • Set limits on gifts and keep things simple. How often have you noticed that young children are often more entertained by gift wrapping and packages—like big empty boxes—for creative play? Art supplies are often the most treasured, enduring and useful gifts.
  • As much as possible, try to connect a gift with an experience. For example, handmade or homemade gifts or cards in which the child participates creatively make for heartfelt and memorable experiences. A book about or memento of a particular activity, thing or place that a child can then have direct experience with in a hands-on way, makes for a wonderful, cherished gift.

Play is essential to a child’s physical, cognitive, social and moral development. Toys, books and experiences that enrich creative play make wonderful gifts for the season and support healthy child development all year long.

Can you remember a time when one of your children received a toy not well suited for his or her age? What did you do?

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