Childhood Epilepsy: What to Do in the Event of a Seizure and How to Prevent Injury

Friday, November 15, 2013 12:49 PM comments (0)

epilepsy smallCurrently about 325,000 American children under the age of 15 have epilepsy, with 200,000 new cases being diagnosed each year, according to the Epilepsy Foundation of America.  Epilepsy is a disorder involving repeated seizures, or episodes of disturbed brain function associated with changes in attention and/or behavior. Although some children will outgrow the disorder or can have it easily managed through medication, others may be more severely impacted throughout their lives.

Kent Kelley, MD, Pediatric Neurology, tells parents, caregivers and teachers what they should know in the event of a seizure as well as some steps they can take to prevent harm from seizures before they happen:

  • Always make sure your child is carrying or wearing some form of medical identification, if appropriate. Teachers and caregivers should be made aware of your child’s disorder and how to act should a seizure occur.
  • Monitor your child’s surroundings for potential hazards. Avoid nearby objects that could cause harm if your child were to have a seizure, such as a hot stove or lawn mower.
  • Even if your child has not experienced a seizure for some time, don’t adjust the dosage of medication without the advice and supervision of your child’s physician. In addition, before giving your child any other medication, check to make sure there will not be a negative reaction with his or her seizure medication. If you have questions, call your physician or pharmacist.
  • In the event of a seizure:
  1. Make sure that clothing isn’t restricting the neck and causing difficulty breathing.
  2. Do not try to hold the child down or restrain him or her.
  3. Remove any objects that could cause harm from around the child.
  4. After the seizure has subsided, position the child on his or her side to help keep the airway clear.
  5. Call 911 if the seizure lasts for longer than five minutes, the child cannot be awakened, or if another seizure begins shortly following the first. Depending on the type of seizure, different actions may need to be taken.

 

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