Sun Safety Tips: Protect Your Skin from the Sun [Infographic]

Wednesday, June 19, 2013 3:41 PM comments (0)

It’s finally here! Summer seems to have arrived and with it warm weather and sunshine. Don’t rush out into the sun just yet though! Sun exposure can damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer. That's why it’s so important to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays every day.

How can you protect your skin? What’s the right sunscreen to use? How often should you reapply it? Is sunscreen safe for everyone?  NorthShore University HealthSystem has you covered with sun safety tips for adults, kids and babies alike.  Click on the image below to access our full infographic with helpful sun safety tips and then go out and enjoy the summer sun without getting burned. 

Best Sunscreen Choice – Spray, Stick or Lotion?

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 8:54 AM comments (0)

SunscreenWhen you plan to be out in the sun for an extended period of time (or even a short while), wearing some form of sun protection is better than nothing. But, with all the options on the market today, how do you know which sunscreen is best for complete sun protection?

Reshma Haugen, MD, Dermatologist at NorthShore, talks about the different types of sunscreen and offers suggestions on which are better than others:

  • Select a sunscreen that works best for you. Spray, stick and lotion sunscreens can all be equally effective, if used correctly. Be sure to read the directions on how to best apply. You’ll also want to make sure you apply sunscreen to all areas of the skin. Some find it easier to do this with lotions, while others prefer the spray. If you are using a spray sunscreen, it’s best to apply a thin layer that you can then rub in with your hands.
  • Choose a sunscreen that offers Broad Spectrum (both UVA and UVB) protection. This choice will help reduce the risk of skin cancer and help prevent early skin aging.
  • Pay attention to the numbers. Sunscreen SPFs (sunscreen protection factor) range from 4 to 100.  A sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher is recommended.  A sunscreen with an SPF value between 4 and 14 can only help prevent sunburn, but not necessarily reduce the risk of skin cancer.
  • Reapply sunscreen every two hours. While it’s important to select a sunscreen that is water resistant, it’s also important to realize that you will still need to reapply.

What type of sunscreen do you prefer to use? Do you use sunscreen every time you are outside in the sun?

Summer Safety – Stay Healthy this Season

Monday, June 18, 2012 10:24 AM comments (0)

Summer-SafetySummer is a great time to be outdoors and to take advantage of the weather. With the temperature changes and increased sunshine, come some summer safety concerns.

Julie Holland, MD, a pediatrician at NorthShore, shares a few quick tips on how you can ensure your family stays safe this summer:

  • Wear sunscreen. Apply sunscreen generously before going outdoors and reapply it frequently while outside.  Use a sunscreen that has both UV-A and UV-B protection, and an SPF 30 or more.  Children under 6 months should stay out of the sun.
  • Stay hydrated. It is important to drink enough fluid to avoid dehydration and heat stroke. Be sure to drink plenty of water before going outdoors and drink fluids while outdoors, especially if you are exercising.   As a general rule, water is the best fluid to drink.
  • Know your plants. Nothing ruins summer fun like the itchy and uncomfortable rash of poison ivy!  As a general rule of thumb, avoid eating berries or fruits you may find in the woods and be sure to avoid plants, such as poison ivy and oak. These plants typically have three leaves (“leaves of three, let them be”) and may have a red tint to them in the spring.
  • Avoid insect bites and stings.  Mosquitoes, bees and ticks are best avoided as well. Mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk.  Long-sleeved tops and long pants protect skin from mosquito and tick bites. Repellents containing DEET are also effective at reducing bites and mosquito netting can be purchased to protect infants outside.  Bee stings can be reduced by limiting use of perfume, avoiding bright colors and floral patterns, and keeping food (especially sweets and fruits) covered.
  • Wear a helmet. Summer is a great time to be more active, which may include biking, skateboarding, rollerblading, etc. Be sure to protect your head during these activities and wear a helmet. Remember that Moms and Dads need helmets as well as kids!

What do you do to keep your family safe and healthy during the summer? What are some of your favorite family activities?

Sun Safety – Limit Your Risks of Developing Skin Cancer

Monday, May 07, 2012 8:42 AM comments (0)

Sun Safety

As the summer approaches, many of us will spend more time outdoors enjoying the weather and the sunshine. While the sunshine can be good for you by improving your mood and giving you a boost in Vitamin D, without the proper protection it can also be harmful to your skin and body.

Aaron Dworin, MD, Dermatologist at NorthShore, offers his advice on how to protect your skin and limit your risk of developing skin cancer, including melanoma:

  • Limit your exposure to the sun. Spend more time in the shade, especially during peak hours (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
  • Generously apply sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher with both UVA and UVB protection) when you know you’ll be out in the sun. Sunscreen should be used any time you know you’ll be outdoors for an extended period of time, even if it’s cloudy outside. Be sure to frequently reapply sunscreen as needed. Fears of not getting enough Vitamin D when using sunscreen are unproven and often overblown.
  • Avoid going to the tanning bed. Despite claims that tanning beds are safe, both UVA and UVB rays can damage your skin.
  • Dress appropriately for the sun. Wear a hat to shield your face, head and ears; wear sunglasses to protect your eyes (100% UVA & UBA protection is best); and wear clothing that limits your skin’s exposure to the sun.
  • Avoid trying to get a tan by sunbathing or applying tanning oils.

How often are you outside in the warmer months? What do you do to protect yourself from the sun?

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