Caregiver and Competitor: Dr. Joseph Alleva Sets a Fitness Example for His Patients

Tuesday, January 20, 2015 2:59 PM comments (0)

Dr. AllevaJoseph Alleva, MD, Division Head of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, walks the walk: he encourages his patients to keep active and sets an example by staying active himself. Dr. Alleva trains in judo and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, competing annually in senior division (over 45) championship. By varying his work out and pushing himself physically, Dr. Alleva prevents overuse injury, manages stress levels and maintains his fitness level.

Here, Dr. Alleva tells us what inspired him to get involved in the world of MMA and how he has overcome his own injuries to continue to compete in the sport he loves:

As a doctor, you encourage your patients to stay fit. How do you keep yourself fit and healthy?
I train in judo and Brazilian jiu-jitsu , both of these disciplines are critical in MMA (mixed martial arts). In the gyms I train in, there are MMA fighters both professional and amateur; therefore, when they want to hone their skills with regard to these disciplines they will train with us. 

How long have you been involved in these sports? What first piqued your interest in/passion for martial arts?
I have been involved in this sport since my early teens. My older brother was a golden glove boxing champion. I was inspired by him and also was his training partner. 

You’ve competed at the senior level world championship in Judo. What steps have you taken to continue competing at such a high level?
I try to qualify for the senior championships in judo and or Brazilian jiu-jitsu annually, so I train in these disciplines through the year and cross train—swim, weight train, bike, run—to avoid overuse injury, control my weight and remain conditioned. I train daily and there are days when I get in a second session of training.

Have you had to overcome any injuries?  How have you prevented further injury?
Ironically, I contend with neck and lower back problems on and off. I can sympathize with my patients who have experienced pain that has prevented them from doing the things in their lives that they enjoy. 

Dr Hudgins (also part of our spine center) has managed my diagnostic tests, treatment and rehabilitation. With his supervision I have been able to maintain my competitive spirit.

What does competing mean to you?
Staying active has long been established as having many health benefits—cholesterol control, diabetes control, pain control, heart health, weight maintenance and more. But, beyond this it helps me manage my stress and by setting goals and varying my activities it makes it a fun activity. That's the key to maintaining an active lifestyle. Exercise never feels like a burden. 

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Maximize Fresh Air Fitness and Reduce Your Odds for Injury

Thursday, April 05, 2012 8:42 AM comments (0)

Sports InjuriesDust off those running shoes and find that soccer, football and/or basketball equipment in the garage or basement because warmer weather is here. And, with spring officially in the air, many of us who had limited exposure to exercise and outdoor activities during the winter begin our regimen.

Not only is spring a busy time for high school and college athletes, but it’s also a time for weekend warriors—those who do much of their physical activity during the weekend—to engage in recreational sports.

Adam Bennett, MD, team physician for U.S. Soccer and the Chicago Bears, offers practical advice to weekend warriors, and high school and college athletes, to reduce injury risk while enjoying outdoor activities:

  • Weekend warriors and recreational athletes should try to include some sort of training and exercise during the week to strengthen muscles. This is especially important for the muscle groups that you will be using in your dominant sport. Implementing this into your weekly routine one to two times can greatly decrease your chances for injury.
  • Teenagers actively involved in sports are encouraged to take a few days off. Not only will this positively impact performance, but it also can help prevent injuries.
  • Teenagers should also be sure to eat well and properly fuel their bodies both before and between practices. Vegetables and lean proteins are a great source of necessary nutrition. Staying well hydrated is also essential.
  • Regardless of how frequently you partake in sports, be sure that if you suffered an injury you have fully recovered and healed before you return to the sport or activity.

What sports do you play? What do you do to reduce your risk for injuries?

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