It’s Nap Time

Friday, March 07, 2014 11:22 AM comments (0)

nappingA lack of sleep can leave you feeling groggy and foggy all day, impairing your ability to focus on work and even retain information. That’s not all; lack of sleep also decreases libido, ages skin and can inhibit your ability to lose weight. Chronic sleep deprivation—regularly forgoing the recommended 7 to 8 hours or due to other sleep disorders—can have serious consequences on your health, including increased risk for heart disease, heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. In other words, maintaining good sleep habits is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle. And, unfortunately, most of us aren't doing that. 

If done correctly, there is great power in a well-timed nap. While you should not rely on naps to repair the damage done by inadequate sleep or chronic sleep deprivation, naps can recharge your energy levels and improve your mood. The key is to time them just right. Short naps are preferable. Longer naps may be taken on occasion to make up for an occasional lapse in sleep schedule.

Thomas Freedom, MD, Neurologist and Program Director of Sleep Medicine at NorthShore, breaks down nap time to help you achieve maximum benefits from a little daytime shuteye:

10 to 20 minutes. Often called the “power nap,” this short rest period is a great way to recharge your personal energy battery, boosting alertness and increasing your midday focus. Keep your power naps to 10 to 20 minutes because you’ll stay in lighter stages of non-rapid eye movement (NREM), which means you won’t wake up feeling groggy and can get right back to work feeling refreshed. Also try to take the nap early in the afternoon.

30 minutes or more. Word of warning: Naps longer than 20 minutes could leave you with sleep inertia, or grogginess that can last up to 30 minutes after waking. If you need to be back on your feet right away, keep your nap to less than 20 minutes. Otherwise, after the fog wears off, you’ll enjoy the same restorative benefits of the power nap.

60 minutes. If you find yourself forgetting information halfway through your day, 60 minutes of shuteye might be able to help. A nap between 30 and 60 minutes will get you to slow-wave sleep, which can help improve your decision-making skills and recollection of information. You’ll need to give yourself a little recovery time after an hour nap, as the effects of sleep inertia could be more pronounced. There is a possibility that a nap of this length could also disrupt your sleep at night.

90 minutes. A 90-minute nap gives you a full sleep cycle—from the lighter stages of sleep all the way to REM (rapid eye movement). A nap of 60 to 90 minutes can improve decision-making skills and even enhance creativity. At this length, make sure to nap with care. You don’t want to disrupt your regular sleep schedule or keep yourself up at night by napping too long during the day. Sleep inertia may also be more of an issue.

Do you take day-time naps to boost your energy levels?

Drowsy Driving – Importance of Driving When Alert

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 8:31 AM comments (0)

Drowsy-DrivingYou are getting sleepy, very sleepy. All hypnosis aside, hopefully when your eyelids get heavy, you yawn uncontrollably and your head begins to nod up and down, you are not behind the wheel of a car.

According to the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep in America poll, a surprising 60 percent of Americans have felt sleepy and drowsy when driving. The reasons are many: you’ve had a long day at work, you’re powering through exits on a road trip to make it to your final destination faster or you’re driving in the evening. No matter what the reason, drowsy driving can be just as dangerous as driving under the influence,and puts both you and others at serious risk.

Neil Freedman, MD, Sleep Medicine specialist at NorthShore, offers his insights on how to stay alert at the wheel and avoid injury:

  • Know the risks for drowsy driving. While everyone is at risk for driving while sleepy due to sleep deprivation, there are certain risk factors and groups of individuals who are at increased risk for sleep-related accidents. Accidents related to drowsy driving are more common in younger individuals (teens and early 20’s); those with untreated sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea; individuals with medical disorders that result in sleep disruption such as chronic pain syndromes, congestive heart failure and COPD; those taking medications that may result in, or enhance the effects of, sleepiness (antihistamines, certain types of pain medications and some classes of antidepressants); and those employed in certain occupations that lead to sleep loss such as shift workers.

    Individuals should also avoid driving in the late evening and in the early morning hours, as this is the time period when our circadian clocks increase our drive for sleep.

  • Know the signs of sleepiness. All individuals who get into automobile accidents due to sleep loss or excessive sleepiness have symptoms long before their accident occurs. It is important to recognize the signs of excessive sleepiness and take action to avoid sleep-related accidents. Common symptoms that are associated with drowsy driving include:
       -   Yawning
       -   Difficulty keeping your eyes open
       -   Difficulty remembering where you have been driving for the last several
           minutes
       -   Ending up too close to the car in front of you
       -   Missing road signs and driving past your turn or exit
       -   Any drifting such as into other lanes, onto the rumble strip or shoulder
           on the side of the road

If you exhibit any of these symptoms while driving or know that you are too tired to drive prior to getting into the car, you should either not get behind the wheel, or pull over to the side of the road or to a rest stop.

  • Prevent sleep-related accidents prior to driving. In addition to pulling over and not driving when you are obviously tired, recommendations to prevent sleepiness-related accidents include:
       -   Get a full night of sleep prior to driving.
       -   Avoid driving late at night or in the early morning hours.
       -   Share the driving with someone else on a long trip.
       -   Avoid sedating medications prior to and while driving.
       -   Pull over and take a nap when you are too tired.
       -   Use caffeine for short-term improvement in alertness. (Importantly,
           caffeine only improves alertness temporarily and is not a substitute for
           adequate amounts of sleep.)

Have you ever been too sleepy to be driving? What do you do to stay alert behind the wheel?

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