It’s Nap Time

Friday, March 07, 2014 11:22 AM comments (0)

nappingA lack of sleep can leave you feeling groggy and foggy all day, impairing your ability to focus on work and even retain information. That’s not all; lack of sleep also decreases libido, ages skin and can inhibit your ability to lose weight. Chronic sleep deprivation—regularly forgoing the recommended 7 to 8 hours or due to other sleep disorders—can have serious consequences on your health, including increased risk for heart disease, heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. In other words, maintaining good sleep habits is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle. And, unfortunately, most of us aren't doing that. 

If done correctly, there is great power in a well-timed nap. While you should not rely on naps to repair the damage done by inadequate sleep or chronic sleep deprivation, naps can recharge your energy levels and improve your mood. The key is to time them just right. Short naps are preferable. Longer naps may be taken on occasion to make up for an occasional lapse in sleep schedule.

Thomas Freedom, MD, Neurologist and Program Director of Sleep Medicine at NorthShore, breaks down nap time to help you achieve maximum benefits from a little daytime shuteye:

10 to 20 minutes. Often called the “power nap,” this short rest period is a great way to recharge your personal energy battery, boosting alertness and increasing your midday focus. Keep your power naps to 10 to 20 minutes because you’ll stay in lighter stages of non-rapid eye movement (NREM), which means you won’t wake up feeling groggy and can get right back to work feeling refreshed. Also try to take the nap early in the afternoon.

30 minutes or more. Word of warning: Naps longer than 20 minutes could leave you with sleep inertia, or grogginess that can last up to 30 minutes after waking. If you need to be back on your feet right away, keep your nap to less than 20 minutes. Otherwise, after the fog wears off, you’ll enjoy the same restorative benefits of the power nap.

60 minutes. If you find yourself forgetting information halfway through your day, 60 minutes of shuteye might be able to help. A nap between 30 and 60 minutes will get you to slow-wave sleep, which can help improve your decision-making skills and recollection of information. You’ll need to give yourself a little recovery time after an hour nap, as the effects of sleep inertia could be more pronounced. There is a possibility that a nap of this length could also disrupt your sleep at night.

90 minutes. A 90-minute nap gives you a full sleep cycle—from the lighter stages of sleep all the way to REM (rapid eye movement). A nap of 60 to 90 minutes can improve decision-making skills and even enhance creativity. At this length, make sure to nap with care. You don’t want to disrupt your regular sleep schedule or keep yourself up at night by napping too long during the day. Sleep inertia may also be more of an issue.

Do you take day-time naps to boost your energy levels?

Don’t Sleep through the Signs: Recognizing Sleep Disorders in Children

Friday, March 08, 2013 11:00 AM comments (0)

pediatric-sleep-disordersA good night’s sleep can be the difference between night and day with children. Frequent lack of sleep can greatly impact a child’s physical, mental and social well-being. It's also hard on the entire family.

It's recommended that children between the ages of six and twelve get 10-11 hours of sleep each night. This allows them to be better rested for school, and to further their growth and development. The challenge with childhood sleep disorders is that they aren’t always easy to recognize. In fact, since the symptoms are so similar to other conditions (such as ADD and ADHD), sleep disorders often go misdiagnosed.

Mari Viola-Saltzman, DO, Sleep Medicine specialist, who sees both pediatric and adult patients, identifies some of the secondary effects childhood sleep disorders may have:

  • Lack of focus in school work. This may lead to poor performance, impaired learning/memory and an inability to concentrate on academic tasks.
  • Short temper and moodiness. Children may not “act like themselves” if they are not getting enough sleep. This can often be misidentified as a behavioral problem or depression.
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness. Children with sleeping disorders often have a more difficult time sleeping through the night, which can lead to drowsiness during the day and also slower reaction times to daytime activities.
  • Appetite and metabolic changes. Studies have indicated that sleep disorders in children may cause obesity, likely due to sleep deprivation affecting the part of the brain called the hypothalamus that regulates hormonal changes, metabolism, hunger and energy expenditures.

How many hours of sleep do your children get each night? Do they have a nightly routine?

 

Sleep Disorders – When It’s More Than Just Snoring

Friday, February 15, 2013 9:00 AM comments (0)

Sleep-DisorderSnoring can impact more than just a restful night of sleep for you and a partner. Snoring is a condition that is caused by the narrowing of the airways and relaxation of muscles in the back of the throat. When chronic, it can reduce the amount of oxygen being supplied to the body, put unnecessary stress on the heart or cause you to stop breathing.

Snoring can be an indicator of other health conditions. For example, sleep apnea—a condition that nearly half of chronic snorers have—can often be linked to cardiac and pulmonary diseases.

Alfredo Gonzalez, MD, Cardiologist at NorthShore, identifies the following symptoms to help determine if you have a sleep disorder:

  • Trouble staying awake during the day (daytime somnolence). If you have a tendency to fall asleep while driving or while in a conversation, you should consider being screened for a sleep disorder. Having a hard time staying awake when doing less-strenuous activities (such as reading or watching a movie) may also be a signal.
  • Feeling tired or fatigued. Not feeling refreshed and re-energized after a night of sleep can be an indicator of a sleep condition, especially if you feel this way consistently.
  • Complaints by your partner that you snore either frequently or all the time at night. There is no way that you can know if you snore at night or not, so it can be helpful if another person tells you.
  • Leg movement in your sleep that disturbs the other party. This can consist of involuntary movement of your limbs—often  jerky—that may or may not wake you up.

How many hours of sleep on average do you get a night? Do you know if you snore?

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