Sun Safety Tips: Protect Your Skin from the Sun [Infographic]

Wednesday, June 19, 2013 3:41 PM comments (0)

It’s finally here! Summer seems to have arrived and with it warm weather and sunshine. Don’t rush out into the sun just yet though! Sun exposure can damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer. That's why it’s so important to protect your skin from the sun’s harmful rays every day.

How can you protect your skin? What’s the right sunscreen to use? How often should you reapply it? Is sunscreen safe for everyone?  NorthShore University HealthSystem has you covered with sun safety tips for adults, kids and babies alike.  Click on the image below to access our full infographic with helpful sun safety tips and then go out and enjoy the summer sun without getting burned. 

Could It Be Skin Cancer? What to Look for During Your Self-Exam

Tuesday, May 21, 2013 3:08 PM comments (0)

skincancerSkin cancer is the most common kind of cancer, accounting for nearly half of all cancers in the U.S. And despite increased awareness of causes, risk factors and methods of prevention, the rates of skin cancer, including the three major types—basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma—continue to climb. Due in part to the use of tanning beds, rates of melanoma, the deadliest type of skin cancer, are especially high in young women in their 20s and 30s.

While prevention should be the priority—limiting exposure to sunlight, using sunscreen and avoiding the use of tanning beds—early detection is the next best thing. If detected early, skin cancer is almost always curable.

Britt Hanson, DO, medical oncology at NorthShore, shares some of her tips for identifying skin cancer, including what you should keep an eye out for during regular self-checks.

  • Have a full-body exam done by a physician. Your physician can ensure that your existing moles, spots or freckles are normal or recommend the precautionary removal of any suspicious ones. 
  • Perform monthly self-exams. After a skin examination by a physician, get in the habit of doing monthly self-exams. Use a full-length mirror to examine your moles and freckles, looking for any changes to existing moles or the development of new ones.
  • Remember your ABCDEs. If any of the moles on your body show signs of the ABCDEs, see a physician immediately.
  1. Asymmetry: One half does not mirror the other
  2. Border: Edges are jagged, blurred or irregular
  3. Color: Changes in color or if a mole is various shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white or red
  4. Diameter: If the diameter is larger than the eraser of a pencil
  5. Evolving: Any changes in size, color or shape 

 

What precautions do you take to reduce your risk of skin cancer?

 

Sun Safety – Limit Your Risks of Developing Skin Cancer

Monday, May 07, 2012 8:42 AM comments (0)

Sun Safety

As the summer approaches, many of us will spend more time outdoors enjoying the weather and the sunshine. While the sunshine can be good for you by improving your mood and giving you a boost in Vitamin D, without the proper protection it can also be harmful to your skin and body.

Aaron Dworin, MD, Dermatologist at NorthShore, offers his advice on how to protect your skin and limit your risk of developing skin cancer, including melanoma:

  • Limit your exposure to the sun. Spend more time in the shade, especially during peak hours (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
  • Generously apply sunscreen (SPF 15 or higher with both UVA and UVB protection) when you know you’ll be out in the sun. Sunscreen should be used any time you know you’ll be outdoors for an extended period of time, even if it’s cloudy outside. Be sure to frequently reapply sunscreen as needed. Fears of not getting enough Vitamin D when using sunscreen are unproven and often overblown.
  • Avoid going to the tanning bed. Despite claims that tanning beds are safe, both UVA and UVB rays can damage your skin.
  • Dress appropriately for the sun. Wear a hat to shield your face, head and ears; wear sunglasses to protect your eyes (100% UVA & UBA protection is best); and wear clothing that limits your skin’s exposure to the sun.
  • Avoid trying to get a tan by sunbathing or applying tanning oils.

How often are you outside in the warmer months? What do you do to protect yourself from the sun?

× Alternate Text