A Healthcare Partnership: Total Joint Replacement at NorthShore

Tuesday, February 18, 2014 4:32 PM comments (0)

Puri“First and foremost, we’re looking for the best possible outcome,” says Lalit Puri, MD, Orthopaedic Surgeon and Division Chair of Adult Reconstruction at NorthShore. And, according to Dr. Puri, the philosophy of the Total Joint Replacement Center at NorthShore is that the best possible outcomes are created from strong partnerships between patients and healthcare professionals. 

Dr. Puri shares more information on the partnerships formed between patients and their orthopaedic care teams at the NorthShore Total Joint Replacement Center:

Why is the partnership between patient and healthcare provider so important?
If we enter into a partnership with our patients, we’re asking the patient to give his or her best before and after surgery, just as we’ll give our best throughout as well.

We know that surgery can certainly be anxiety-provoking, but we don’t want patients to come into NorthShore feeling like that. So our partnerships are about trying to demystify the process. Our partnerships start with an open and honest dialogue. 

Part of that demystification process is patient education. Why is educating the patient before surgery so important?
It’s critical that the patient has an understanding of what to expect before surgery. Most importantly because it reduces anxiety in the patient’s mind so that he or she is more comfortable with what’s ahead. I also think that the more educated a patient is about surgery, the more he or she can participate in his or her care. A more informed patient has a better understanding of what is happening, and therefore may be a more active participant. 

What does patient education at the Total Joint Replacement Center involve?
A key element of our partnership with the patient is our comprehensive Patient Education Program. This program guides patients through the entire process of a total joint replacement before surgery even happens, from pre-surgery preparation recommendations to full rehabilitation. 

Patients are encouraged to attend a class prior to surgery that is run by a team of specially trained orthopaedic nurses. In this class, they learn what they can do to be active participants in their own care, and have an opportunity to interact with many of the clinicians who will be a part of their care teams.

The Patient Education Program is not just about educating patients though. Our multidisciplinary team uses this time to learn about the individual needs of each patient by asking and answering questions, getting to know each individual patient, to discover the best way to help patients maximize their health before the surgical procedure.

Find out more about the Patient Education Program and Total Joint Replacement Center here: northshore.org/orthopaedics

Watch Your Step – Avoid Foot and Ankle Injuries this Season

Friday, February 17, 2012 7:46 AM comments (0)

Foot-Ankle_InjuryWhat do you do to avoid slipping? Do have a preferred method for staying injury-free?

Our feet and ankles get a workout every day – even if it’s just from walking around the house or to and from the car running errands. According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, one hour of strenuous exercise puts up to one million pounds of pressure on your feet. Now imagine how much additional stress your feet and ankles can be subjected to when roads and sidewalks are icy and snowy.

Lan Chen, MD, an orthopaedic physician at NorthShore offers her insight on how to avoid a foot or ankle injury this season:

  • Wear the right shoes for the right weather.  High-heeled boots may be fashionable, but flat or low-heeled boots with good traction soles are best for the snow.  Avoid wearing long flowing dresses or coats as they can get tangled with your feet and cause you to lose your balance.
  • Use caution and check for slick walkways or roads when exiting your car or home.  Keep doorways clutter-free and watch out for slippery areas. Most importantly, keep your hands free for better balance and support in case you begin to fall.
  • Don’t ignore an injury.  If you have pain, swelling and inability to put weight on your foot or ankle, or just feel as if something isn’t right, seek medical attention.  Some seemingly minor sprains can lead to significant ligament and cartilage damage resulting in long-term pain, instability and, ultimately, arthritic changes if they are not treated.
  • If you aren’t able to immediately see your doctor, use the R.I.C.E method:
    o    R: Rest your foot or ankle.  Staying off it will minimize pain.
    o    I: Ice your injury to help reduce swelling.  Never put an ice pack directly  
         onto bare skin; use a thin towel to cover the ice pack and ice for 20
         minutes at a time.
    o    C: Compress the area of swelling with an ACE wrap or an elastic brace.
    o    E: Elevate the foot above the level of the heart. 
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