Proper Dosage: Medication and Children

Friday, March 15, 2013 10:48 AM comments (0)

Peds-DosageWhen children get sick, the simple solution isn’t always just a pill or spoonful away. Aside from the fact that many medications are not recommended for children, it's also much easier for a child to overdose on medication than an adult.

In most cases, the amount of medicine a child should receive is determined by age, weight and height. When it comes to children and medication, reading labels is very important.

Dirk Killelea, Manager of NorthShore Evanston Hospital Pharmacy, shares the following “must-know” tips for giving children medications:

  • Do not give your child a reduced dosage of a medication meant for adults. Most medicine labels provide a recommended dosage that is based on age. If your child’s age isn’t reflected on this label, then it is not appropriate to give to him or her. Even liquid medication for infants is more concentrated than liquid medication meant for older children. When in doubt, ask your pharmacist or physician.
  • Avoid giving your child over-the-counter cold medicine. Cold medicine should definitely be avoided in children under the age of two, and the same may also be true for older children. These medications can cause more harm than good, and home remedies--humidifier, steam baths and elevation--may prove more effective.
  • Steer clear of some medications. Unless otherwise instructed by a physician, avoid giving children Aspirin, over-the-counter laxatives, herbal or natural supplements and expired medications.
  • Use appropriate measuring devices. Don’t use a household teaspoon or tablespoon to measure doses of liquid medication.  Ask your pharmacy for an oral syringe or graduated measuring spoon. These devices measure the appropriate amount of medication and don’t vary in size like household silverware.

The best remedy for most kids is rest and hydration. If your child has a fever or cold, keep activities to a minimum and make sure they aren't too strenuous. Coloring, drawing or reading stories is a great way to spend time until he or she feels better. If your child is experiencing loose stools or diarrhea, make sure to provide plenty of water or electrolyte-containing drinks like Pedialyte to prevent dehydration.   

How do you manage your kids’ illnesses? What remedies work best for you?

 

Medicine Cabinet Clean Up – The Do’s and Don’ts of Proper Disposal

Thursday, November 29, 2012 12:54 PM comments (0)

How often do you purge your medicine cabinet? You should plan to clean through your cabinet and properly dispose of any medications every six months. Using expired medications can be hazardous to your health. Therefore, you should not be saving unused prescription medications for later use, nor be saving expired prescription or over-the-counter medications.

Tina Zook, Pharmacy Manager, provides the following instructions for properly disposing of medications:

  • Do not flush medications down the toilet. Most medications should be disposed of in other ways. For a complete list of medications that can be flushed down the toilet or poured down the sink, refer to the FDA website.
  • Follow any specific medication disposal instructions on the drug label or patient information.
  • Contact your city or county government’s household trash and recycling services for locations to return your unwanted medications (Drug Take-Back Programs). Find out if there are any restrictions on the types of medications that can be returned.

There will be instances where instructions are not given on the drug label and a drug take-back program is not available. In these cases, you follow the following steps for disposing of medications:

  1. Take the medication out of the original containers (do not crush tablets or capsules) and mix the medication with an unpalatable substance (kitty litter or used coffee grounds).
  2. Place the mixture in a sealable bag or empty container to prevent the medication from leaking or breaking out of a garbage bag.
  3. Throw the sealable bag or other container in the household garbage.

How often do you clean your medicine cabinet? What has your process been for disposing of medications?

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