Sports Injury Prevention: Common Sports Injuries & How to Prevent Them [Infographic]

Monday, February 17, 2014 9:44 AM comments (0)

Developing a regular exercise routine is one of the most important elements of a healthy lifestyle, and roughly 53% of Americans show their agreement by exercising three or more days a week. However, participation in any physical activity, whether it's hitting the gym or the slopes, increases your risk for an exercise-related injury. Still, the health benefits of exercise far outweigh the risks, as long as you approach each new physical activity and sport armed with the right information.

Get fit but also stay safe with the help of our sports injury prevention infographic. Learn how to recognize common sports injuries that affect both athletes and energetic amateurs and use our simple, easy-to-follow sports injury prevention tips to keep you pain free and active. Click on the link to view our full NorthShore University HealthSystem infographic.

infographic

Crossing the Finish Line: Race-Day Tips for New Marathoners

Friday, October 11, 2013 10:31 AM comments (0)

marathonYou’ve come all this way. You’ve spent months training and run hundreds of miles to prepare for race day. Don’t let a preventable injury keep you from crossing that finish line or ruin the prospects of running marathon number two in the near future.

From mile one to the final stretch, stay injury-free with these tips from Carrie Jaworski, MD, Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine at NorthShore: 

  • Don’t try something new on race day. This rule applies to nearly everything. Don’t eat a food you haven’t eaten during training. It could upset your stomach and result in more time than you would like spent in the restrooms along the race route. Don’t wear clothing you haven’t worn before, from shorts and shirts to socks and shoes. Untested clothing might feel fine at mile five but by mile 18 you could be dealing with race-ending chafing or blisters.
  • Start slow and maintain a steady pace. Don’t let the excitement at the starting line get the best of you. There are 26.2 miles ahead of you, so conserve your energy and start slow. Passing and weaving amongst the thousands of runners at the starting line also increases the possibility of injury from tripping and falling. Maintaining a steady pace means you’ll finish strong instead of struggling to the end. 
  • Have a plan about fluid intake. Prepare ahead of time by staying hydrated on the days leading up to the race. Your urine should be clear yellow, not dark. On race day, you should alternate water and an electrolyte drink at the pace you established during your training. Be careful to avoid drinking at every fluid station, as that can increase your risk of hyponatremia (low blood sodium). A good rule of thumb is to drink 4-6 ounces every 15-20 minutes after the first 30-60 minutes of exercise.  Be sure to consume gels with water. And don’t forget to hydrate after the race as well!
  • Listen to your body. If the race doesn’t go as planned, don’t ignore what your body is telling you. There are medical aid stations throughout the course and at the finish line to help you if you are unsure. Remember, no matter what happens, you have already succeeded by all the hard work you put in to get to the starting line.
  • Bring a change of clothes. Always have a change of warm, dry clothes waiting for you after the race. You’ll need to keep your muscles warm to avoid cramping after the race is over. Depending on the weather, if you sit in sweat-soaked clothes for too long, you risk developing hypothermia.
  • Stretch! Make sure to stretch and roll out sore muscles soon after finishing the race. Stretching after the race is an important way to help minimize muscle soreness the next day. Scheduling a massage for the next day is good too!

Wishing Chicago Marathon runners, old and new, a happy and successful race day from NorthShore University HealthSystem. 

Youth Sports: Staying Active and Injury-Free

Friday, September 13, 2013 3:53 PM comments (0)

youth sportsPracticing multiple days during the week. Competing in tournaments on the weekend. Participating in rigorous training camps and leagues in the off-season. Playing the same or multiple sports year round. Does this resemble your child’s sports schedule?

Youth sports are becoming more competitive at younger ages, often requiring participation beyond the normal season to make the cut and see more starting time during games. As the pressure to participate increases and youth sports become more “professional,” your child’s risk for injury increases too. Sports are a great way to keep your child involved and active, but year-round practices for the same sport can lead to some health concerns as well, including stress fractures, ligament tears and musculoskeletal issues.  

Eric Chehab, MD, a NorthShore affiliated orthopaedic surgeon, offers some tips to help keep your kids active and injury-free:

  • Encourage participation in multiple sports. Not only will this prevent your child from overexerting the same muscle groups, it will also help develop different skills. A young athlete’s agility on the tennis court could be the key to helping him block the winning shot in the soccer net.  If your child does participate in multiple sports, try to ensure that he or she isn’t overlapping them in a season or throughout the week.
  • Limit your child to one committed sport per season. With more sports vying for year-round commitment, your child may be participating in multiple sports or leagues simultaneously.  If sport requires a great deal of practice time, this puts your child at increased risk for serious injury.  Here’s a useful rule of thumb to help prevent injury: “One sport per season and one league per sport.” 
  • Take one day off every week. Between all of the practices and games, it’s important for your child to have at least one day of rest each week.  A day off gives the body a chance to heal and recover.  You should also encourage your child to take one month off from sports and practices each year, especially if he or she is deeply involved in one or more sports. 
  • Ensure there is proper equipment and field conditions. Though this may appear obvious, much of the equipment used in recreational sports and travel leagues had been used previously and could be worn or defective.  This could expose your child to unnecessary risk. Field conditions are also important because a compromised field puts your child at risk for significant lower and upper extremity injuries.
  • Check in with the coach. The ability to teach safe technique is critical, particularly in contact sports like football and hockey.  Get to know your child’s coach and make sure he or she knows the rules of the game and how to play safety and prevent serious injury.

For additional information about sports injuries, including sports-specific tip sheets, visit the Stop Sports Injuries website: http://www.stopsportsinjuries.org 

What do you to keep your kids active?  How do you make sure they aren’t overdoing it?

After the Finish Line: Recovering from a Race

Monday, October 08, 2012 10:01 AM comments (0)

The months of training have come to a close and you’ve crossed the finish line. Now what?

Carrie Jaworksi, MD, Director of Primary Care Sports Medicine and a physician at NorthShore, offers her insight on what to expect after the race and how to recover adequately to ensure that you are ready to race again another day:

Immediately After the Race : Once you cross that finish line there are a handful of things that you'll need to do to help your body recover. Eat something! It’s important to replenish the energy stores you depleted during the race. Initially, it’s best to start with a sports drink and food that is easy to digest. If you can’t tolerate sports drinks, then take  bananas, yogurt and pretzels to the finish line instead. Gradually work up to a high-carbohydrate post-race dinner to further assist you in replenishing your energy stores.

Taking a cold bath and icing your muscles is recommended to help prevent muscle soreness but don’t do that immediately. It is more important to keep moving in that first 30 to 60 minutes. You'll be tired but try to resist the urge to sit; instead, take a long walk back to your hotel or car. Your body will thank you for it later.

The Next Day: You ran for a long time and chances are you are you'll wake up sore the next day. To help ease your muscle pain, plan ahead and schedule a massage for the days following the race. It will certainly help to alleviate your soreness and speed your recovery. Plan on being sore for a few days. Take it easy while you are recovering.

Post-Event Emotions: You may feel down after the race. Think about it: You’ve been training for this event, both physically and mentally for months, and now it’s over. The early recovery period will likely be the most difficult transition because you won’t be running and will have more time to reflect on your experience. There are several ways you can combat this: 1) Plan to meet up with your running friends the Saturday after the race to discusses personal experiences with the race. 2) Combit to a new goal whether it's another race or even just to keep up with a regular running routine once you recover. 3) Splurge on a treat for yourself, from a new pair of running shoes to that racing watch you’ve been eyeing. Whatever you do, enjoy your downtime and get some much-needed rest.  

Preparing for the Next Race: How long should you rest before training for the next race? While your break time depends on your own level of experience with distance running, it’s recommended that you give your body at least one day off per mile before running your next distance race. This means the earliest you should race again after a marathon is almost a month. Everyone should plan on a reverse taper over the first three to four weeks post-marathon. The first week post-marathon should be mainly rest for three days, with some gentle jogging and cross training to round out the end of the week. By the weekend, most of your muscle soreness should be gone, so a longer distance may be reasonable. Remember to go slow and keep it to an hour at most. 

After the first week post-marathon, you can begin to build more mileage based on your level of experience. Be sure to keep some cross-training days on your schedule to keep your body strong and injury-free. Any persisting soreness or undue fatigue may be your body’s way of telling you it needs more time to recover. Be sure to listen to your body and adjust your training, or see your physician as needed.

How did you feel after the race? What tips would offer to others?

× Alternate Text