Heart Disease: Women vs. Men

Tuesday, February 25, 2014 1:10 PM comments (0)

man vs woman heart healthHeart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women. Each year, approximately 600,000 people will die of heart disease, nearly half of them women. And yet many still believe that heart disease is a man’s disease. It’s not.

There are some possible differences, however, between men and women when it comes to heart disease. Brian Shortal, MD, Cardiologist at NorthShore, discusses these differences and the heart disease risk factors that are the same for everyone:

Age. Men are considered at cardiovascular risk starting at 40. Women, on the other hand, are considered at cardiac risk starting at 50. That does not mean that women under the age of 50 have no risk for heart disease, so any symptoms should not be disregarded.  The incidence of heart disease between men and women equalizes around 65, and studies then show that women actually begin to surpass heart disease events in comparison to men. 

Symptoms. Typically, men exhibit more classic cardiac symptoms, including pain across the chest that radiates down the arms, back and jaw, and shortness of breath. Women might display more atypical symptoms like nausea, vomiting, dizziness and syncope (fainting/temporary loss of consciousness). In fact, the most common symptom in women over 80 is not chest pain but shortness of breath. 

Risk Factors. The risk factors are the same for both men and women. The major risk factors for coronary artery disease are hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, family history of heart disease, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. If you think you might be at risk, see your physician for more information. 

Do you know your risk for heart disease?

Living a Heart-Healthy Life

Friday, February 08, 2013 8:31 AM comments (0)

 

Heart-Health-blogLet’s put the heart back into February. Aside from Valentine’s Day, this month is a great time to give some heartfelt attention to our cardiovascular systems. Small changes can be made to your day-to-day routine to help keep your heart in shape.

Hani Salti, MD, shares the following advice for ensuring a healthy heart:

  • Maintain a healthy weight and exercise often. Physical activity not only has great benefits on our cardiovascular system—improvements can often be seen within a few weeks of beginning a routine—but it also can reduce blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose levels. This in turn can help reduce your chances of developing heart disease.
  • Give up tobacco for good. Smoking takes a toll on your lungs, but it does the same for your body. Smokers have a much higher risk of developing coronary heart disease than those who don’t smoke.
  • Eat right and watch your portions. A smart, nutritious diet can greatly improve many body functions—and the heart is one of them. If you have a hard time watching your portions, try to eat slower. You may be surprised to learn you’re full before needing to reach for seconds.
  • Eliminate stress and focus on the positive. We live in a world where multi-tasking has become the new normal. Be sure to take time out of your busy day on a daily basis to unwind and relax.
  • Know your genes. If heart disease runs in your family, you may want to pay closer attention to ways to keep your heart healthy. You may also want to consult with your physician to see what other prevention and early detection measures you should employ to reduce your risk.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services through their Million Hearts™ Initiative identifies the “ABCS” of improving cardiovascular care: Aspirin for those at risk; Blood pressure control; Cholesterol management; and Smoking cessation.

How do you keep your heart healthy?

 

× Alternate Text