Fresh Recipe: Healthy Spring Rolls Three Ways

Monday, April 07, 2014 8:00 AM comments (0)

Spring rollsFresh spring rolls are a quick way to boost your intake of nutrient-dense foods. Simply purchase the pre-made rice papers (spring roll wrappers), fill with your favorite vegetables, roll, and enjoy.  You can add lean protein like shrimp, chicken breast or tofu to make spring rolls a more filling snack or a meal.  Low sodium soy sauce is a perfect accompaniment to these healthy treats. 

Katrina Herrejon, Certified Diabetes Educator at NorthShore, shares her recipe for healthy spring rolls three ways:

Ingredients:
Spicy: Serrano pepper, radish, lettuce and green onion
American: Avocado, carrots, zucchini, red pepper and basil
Shrimp: Shrimp, cucumber, bean sprouts and cilantro 

Reasons to Love Spring Rolls:

  1. Portable. Sometimes there is just no time for a knife and fork.  Springs rolls are a great way to take your vegetables on the go. And, they can be eaten with one hand.
  2. Raw. Uncooked vegetables are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals.  They are also particularly filling, which helps to make these low-calorie wraps satisfying.
  3. Quick. You don’t need to perfectly julienne your vegetables to make a delicious spring roll.  Just finely chop whatever vegetables you have on hand and roll it up!  

Nutrition Information Spicy: 

Calories 48
Total Fat 1g
Total Carbohydrate 9g
Fiber 1g
Protein 1g

Nutrition Information American:
Calories 62
Total Fat 3g
Total Carbohydrate 10g
Fiber 2g
Protein 1g

Nutrition Information Shrimp:
Calories 59
Total Fat 1.5 g
Total Carbohydrate 9g
Fiber 1g
Protein 3.5g

*Nutrition information may vary based on brand of spring roll wrapper used. 

Spring "Clean" Your Diet: Clean Eating Guidelines and Benefits [Infographic]

Thursday, March 20, 2014 9:14 AM comments (0)

This year, spring clean your diet, too. "Clean" eating means to create a balanced diet of fresh, unprocessed foods with the central focus on fruits and vegetables. The health benefits of clean eating are many, such as possible weight loss and the reduction of one's risk for diabetes and some types of cancer, including colon cancer.

The experts at NorthShore University HealthSystem have created an infographic that illustrates the benefits of clean eating and breaks down the most important clean eating guidelines. Click on the image below to view the full infographic.

infographic image

The Mediterranean Diet: A Heart-Healthy Lifestyle for the Entire Family

Wednesday, February 26, 2014 11:55 AM comments (0)

Med DietHeart disease remains the leading cause of death in the U.S. for both men and women. Genetics, tobacco use, family history, obesity, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, stress and diet all contribute to this alarming statistic. And while some heart-healthy changes are easier to make than others, finding a balanced diet that appeals to the entire family, while also possibly lowering your risk for heart disease, might be easier and more enjoyable than you think.

Studies have shown that the rates of heart disease as well as certain types of cancer, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s were lower for those living in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. Researchers were able to determine that diet played a significant role in keeping the community healthy and living longer. The fundamental components of that diet are known as the Mediterranean diet.

Philip Krause, MD, Interventional Cardiologist at NorthShore, discusses what makes the Mediterranean diet so great for your heart:

Focuses on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. On a typical American plate, meat is the star. On a Mediterranean diet plate, meat plays second fiddle to fresh fruit, vegetables, beans and whole grains. When the focus on the meal shifts toward fresh fruits and vegetables, the result is a diet rich in vitamins, antioxidants and fiber.

Puts the salt shaker away. Excessive salt consumption can raise your blood pressure, which may damage the arteries leading to your heart. And there’s no doubt about it: Americans consume too much salt. The Mediterranean diet diversifies the spice rack, favoring spices and herbs over salt.

Cuts down on red meat. Red meat is sidelined in favor of proteins that contain healthy fats like fish, poultry and nuts. Fish is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which can be very beneficial. 

Makes olive oil the main source of fat. Just say no to butter. Olive oil is a monounsaturated fat and this type of fat may help bring high cholesterol levels in the right direction. It also may help regulate insulin levels in those suffering from type 2 diabetes.  

Allows for a glass of red wine. This is a great perk for the older adherents of the Mediterranean diet. When consumed in moderation (one four-ounce serving per day), red wine can be beneficial to your heart health by reducing LDL cholesterol levels and increasing HDL cholesterol levels. 

Limits portion sizes and cuts the carbs. Just because the Mediterranean diet is healthy doesn’t mean recommended foods can be consumed in unlimited quantities. Watch your portion sizes as you would with any diet or dish. If both weight loss and heart health are goals, limiting portion sizes along with carbohydrate intake—reducing the consumption of bread, potatoes, rice by 50%—can markedly assist in weight loss.

Share your heart-healthy Mediterranean diet recipes with us on Facebook. 

Taking on Trans Fats

Friday, January 31, 2014 11:59 AM comments (0)

trans fatThe Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced in 2013 that it plans to label partially hydrogenated oils (PHO’s), which are the primary dietary source of trans fats, as not generally recognized as safe for use in food. This relabeling of trans fats is just the first move in a process that will likely lead to a ban on trans fats in the U.S. food supply. 

Trans fat first entered the American food supply in 1911 in the form of Crisco shortening. Fairly early in its history, preliminary studies show that trans fats could be more harmful than other fats. Later studies confirmed this finding, indicating that trans fat contributed to heart disease.  While their presence has already been greatly reduced in the food supply, trans fats can still be found in many processed foods, like frozen pizzas, microwave popcorn, baked goods, margarine and store-bought icings. 

Philip Krause, MD, Director for the Section of Cardiology at NorthShore Skokie Hospital, explains why doctors have long urged their patients to stay away from trans fats:

  • Increases LDL cholesterol. High levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, build up the walls of your arteries and can make them hard and narrow. Elevated LDL cholesterol levels are a significant risk factor for heart disease, heart attack and stroke. Consumption of trans fats can raise the bad LDL cholesterol in the body.
  • Lowers HDL cholesterol. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is your cholesterol friend. It’s responsible for cleaning up your bloodstream, picking up excess cholesterol from where it doesn’t belong and bringing it back to your liver.
  • Increases triglycerides. A type of fat found in blood, triglycerides are also partly responsible for the hardening of arteries. When combined with high LDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides put you at high risk for stroke, heart attack, heart disease and even diabetes. 
  • Causes inflammation. Inflammation is the body’s response to injury. Trans fats can increase inflammation by damaging the lining of the blood vessels. Inflammation may also be a cause of fatty blockages in the heart’s blood vessels. 

Notably, manufacturers have made steps to reduce fat levels in many foods and products. Since 2006, after which food labels reported trans fat content, intake of this substance has dropped significantly.

It is hoped, after the FDA finalizes its preliminary determination, PHO’s would be considered as “food additives” and could only be used with prior authorization. The primary goal and hope is that with better consumer education and these changes in product and food manufacturing, Americans can look forward to much healthier life ahead.

 

Four Healthy Changes You Should Make This Year

Wednesday, January 01, 2014 8:00 AM comments (0)

healthy changesDo you make a New Year’s resolution every year? How long does this resolution stick around on your to-do list? Many of us start the year with the best intentions only to fall back into our old, unhealthy habits by February or March. This year, make healthy positive changes instead of resolutions and look forward to a healthier year ahead. 

Richard S. Katz, MD, Internal Medicine at NorthShore, shares some healthy changes he would tell all his patients to make this year:

  • Exercise more. Don’t just make a resolution to lose weight again this year. Broaden your overall focus to include a bigger, better change. Implementing a regular exercise routine into your day-to-day life is the single best thing you can do for your health. It boosts your immune system and mood, reduces stress levels, improves heart health and, as a result, you’ll probably lose weight as well.  Your exercise routine should consist of a minimum of 150 minutes per week of aerobic exercise, plus strength training and stretching.  For example, three days a week of indoor cycling and two days of yoga.
  • Change the way you eat. Don’t try to cut out sweets altogether because you’ll likely overindulge a month or two into the New Year. Instead, focus your attention on your overall diet by eating healthy, well-balanced meals as often as possible. With a healthier overall diet, you won’t have to beat yourself up if you indulge in something sweet every now and then. Make fruits and vegetables the center of your diet instead of meat-based protein. Remember: If it walks on four or more legs, then include it in no more than two meals per week. And, always make sure you keep your portion sizes under control. 
  • Get a yearly physical. Are you seeing your primary care physician every year? You should be. Take the time to make that yearly appointment and do your homework before you get there. Write down any health complaints, research your family history and assemble questions ahead of time. Your doctor can help you better understand what you’re doing right and what you need to improve.
  • Find a way to de-stress. Identify what has your stress levels soaring and find a way to address it. Chronic stress can increase blood pressure, risk of infection and cause headaches, insomnia and more. Finding a way to reduce stress levels can improve both your physical and mental health. Exercise is a great stress reducer and finding a quiet place to sit and breathe can work wonders. Determine something that works for you and make plenty of time for it in your schedule.  In order to handle stress well, we all need seven to eight hours of sleep a night.

What healthy changes do you plan to make this year?

Meet Your Protein Needs Without Meat

Thursday, October 10, 2013 2:44 PM comments (0)

Protein is an essential element of a healthy, well-balanced diet. In fact, protein makes up a large part of all your body’s cells, which is why it is so important that you get enough each day. And that’s especially true for those following a vegetarian, nearly vegetarian or vegan diet who don’t get their daily requirement from protein-rich sources like meat. The good news is that reaching your daily protein needs doesn’t mean having to include more meat or even any meat all.Vegetarian-Protein

Just how much protein do you need on a daily basis? Women need approximately 46 grams and men 56 grams of protein each day. Pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers need to add additional protein to their diets. On average, it is recommended that they get 70 grams each day. Athletes and active individuals also require more protein based on the length, frequency and intensity of their workouts, which could mean increasing their protein intake by 50% more than a non-active man or woman.

Nearly every food contains some amount of protein but there are plenty of protein-rich, vegetarian-friendly options out there too. It might surprise you just how much protein there is in some of these healthy, meatless foods.

Jennifer Panicko, RD, LDN at NorthShore, shares some of the best veggie-friendly options to maximize daily protein intake:

  • Lentils. These pack a serious protein punch with 18 grams of protein per cooked cup. 
  • Greek yogurt. All dairy products are good sources of protein but Greek yogurt kicks it up a notch with approximately 20 grams per 6-ounce serving.
  • Chickpeas. There are 8 grams of protein per serving of chickpeas. Chickpeas also happen to be the main ingredient in hummus. Put it on crackers or veggies for a high-protein snack.
  • Beans. This one won’t surprise you. Most beans—black, pinto, soy—are heavy hitters when it comes to protein, with approximately 7 to 10 grams per serving. They’re also lower in calories than meat-based proteins and have lots of fiber and antioxidants.
  • Fruits and vegetables. That’s right! They are great sources of protein as well. Avocados have about 5 grams of protein per serving and a cup of spinach has 5 grams too.
  • Eggs. Many vegetarians won’t eat eggs but for lacto-ovo vegetarians (consume dairy and eggs), they are a great source with 6 grams per egg.
  • Tempeh and Tofu. These whole soy alternatives are great sources of protein with 8-12 grams per 3-ounce serving.
  • Quinoa. This grain is a complete protein, meaning it has the same protein content and quality of an egg! This super grain packs 8 grams of protein in 1 cooked cup.

What are some of your favorite vegetarian protein sources?

Go Green: Your Colon (and Body) Will Thank You

Wednesday, March 06, 2013 1:52 PM comments (0)


ColonCancerAs the old adage goes, “You are what you eat.” When it comes to your health, this saying is true — eating healthier foods will make you feel better, have more energy and help you maintain your weight.

Many of the foods we eat—as tasty as they are—aren’t always the easiest for our system to digest. This is true for highly processed foods, and foods high in sodium, sugar, saturated fats and cholesterol. It’s not to say that, in moderation, we can’t enjoy some of these foods, but research has proven that a diet high in fresh food, especially green vegetables, may help prevent colon cancer.

Considering colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and women, it’s nice to know that a balanced, healthy diet may be the first step toward disease prevention. Yolandra Johnson, MD, Gastroenterologist at NorthShore, provides easy ways to work more greens and other vegetables into your daily diet:

  • Add chopped vegetables to your pasta sauces. Add chopped or shredded zucchini, carrot, peas, spinach or eggplant into either homemade or store-bought sauces. You’ll be adding extra flavor and more nutrients.
  • Blend it up. Smoothies don’t have to be made with only fruit. Consider mixing a more savory blend by adding in vegetables. Spinach is a great addition to fruit smoothies.
  • Eat a side salad with lunch or dinner. A salad is a great way to get an extra serving of vegetables, plus it will help fill you up before the main course. That’s good for your diet and for your waistline!
  • Choose ready-made options if you’re short on time. Canned and frozen vegetables can be just as nutritious as fresh ones. If you have limited time to prepare meals, go for prepared salads,  pre-chopped veggies, canned goods or frozen items. Remember, there’s no wrong way to add vegetables to your diet.
  • Snack on fresh vegetables instead of chips and other junk foods. Cucumbers, peapods, carrots, peppers and celery all make great snack items. Prepare small bags of these veggies for the week so they’re easy to grab and go.

What are some of your favorite dishes that include vegetables? What are some of your tricks for including veggies in your diet?

 

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