Keep the Season Bright: 12 Holiday Health and Safety Tips [Infographic]

Friday, December 13, 2013 9:53 AM comments (0)

It’s the most wonderful time of the year, so don’t let an illness, injury or accident keep you from celebrating a happy, healthy holiday season with your family and friends.  Whether you’re outside shoveling snow or inside preparing your favorite seasonal dishes, our 12 holiday health and safety tips are sure to help keep the season bright.

This year, share our holiday safety infographic with your friends and family to spread holiday health tips as well as cheer. Click on the image below to see our full holiday safety infographic

holiday infographic

Fall into Wellness with Health and Fitness Tips Suited to the Season [Infographic]

Wednesday, October 30, 2013 12:49 PM comments (0)

Cooler temperatures are no excuse to let your health and wellness fall by the wayside. In fact, fall is the perfect time to take advantage of some of the highlights of the season, from incorporating seasonal fruits and vegetables into your diet to kicking your fitness routine up a notch with fall-friendly activities. 

NorthShore University HealthSystem has created an infographic filled with fall health tips and creative fall fitness suggestions. Click on the image to see our full Fall into Wellness infographic

Flu Season: Protecting Your Family from the Bug

Thursday, October 24, 2013 9:00 AM comments (0)

flu seasonEvery flu season is different but there’s one thing you can count on: there will be one.  Flu season in the U.S. can begin as early as October and continue into late May. Perhaps you’ve already noticed an uptick in coughing and sneezing on the train, in the office or at school, but it’s not too late to take action and keep your family happy and healthy throughout flu season. 

Curtis Mann, MD, Family Medicine at NorthShore, shares some top tips for keeping the flu from catching up with you and the rest of your family this season:

  • Vaccinate! The annual flu vaccine is the best way to protect against and prevent the spread of  the flu. Everyone over the age of six months can and should be vaccinated against the flu each year, especially children under five and people over 65 because they are at high risk for serious flu-related complications.
  • Wash your hands. You, but especially your hands, come into contact with millions of germs and bacteria every single day. You can pick them up from surfaces, computer keyboards and the shake of a hand. Regular handwashing is one of the very best ways to avoid spreading illness and getting sick. Washing your hands frequently throughout the day can’t get rid of everything but it prevents the build-up of germs. It only takes a little water, some soap and the ABCs—don’t stop washing until you get to Z.
  • Remember your devices. One of the best ways to prevent the spread of germs, especially during flu season, is to keep surfaces clean. Countertops and door handles are obvious hotspots but when was the last time you disinfected your phone or tablet? Phones and tablets go everywhere you go, but unlike hands, they aren’t washed after every trip to the bathroom and then they spend the majority of their time near your hands, nose and mouth. Studies show that phones and tablets are likely to carry many of the same contaminants in the same numbers as the door handle of a bathroom.  Wipe down the screens and bodies of your gadgets regularly with a non-alcohol based cleaner. 
  • Be healthy to stay healthy. The key to avoiding illness is stay healthy on a day-to-day basis. Make sure you are getting adequate sleep, stay active with exercise, make sure you are managing your stress levels and eat a healthy, well-balanced diet whenever possible. 
  • See your doctor. If you think you were exposed to someone with the flu, anti-viral drugs, which are 70-90% effective, can help prevent you from developing the flu. 
  • And a friendly reminder. You can't get the flu from the flu shot or nasal spray, so vaccinate, vaccinate, vaccinate!

Do you make sure to get the flu vaccine every year? 

Breakfast – The Most Important Meal of the Day

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 8:26 AM comments (1)

BreakfastBetween the morning rush of getting out the door on time and organizing schedules, breakfast isn’t always top of mind. However, it should be.

Michael Rakotz, MD, Primary Care Physician at NorthShore, notes that it is the most important meal of the day, especially for kids. He offers his insight on some healthy breakfast options to help fuel you and your kids throughout the day:

  • Unsweetened Oatmeal
    Sweeten it with raisins, apples, blueberries, or a bit of honey.
  • Eggs – Free Range Recommended
    Free-range hens that roam around eat grass. Their eggs will have more Omega-3s and nutrients. If you don’t have time to make eggs in the morning, make hard-boiled eggs the night before.
  • Yogurt and Fruit
    Greek Yogurt has more protein, making it a good choice for a growing child. Be sure to read yogurt labels to watch out for added sugar.
  • Whole Grain Toast
  • Cereal
    Be sure to read the label, as health claims like “contains whole grains” don’t always mean it’s the best option. It’s best to eat cereals that have 5 or less grams of sugar per serving.

What is your daily breakfast go-to food? Do you change it up throughout the week?

Trimming Down in 2012 – A Quick Guide to Weight Loss

Thursday, January 12, 2012 8:10 AM comments (2)

The New Year is upon on us, and with that comes the resolution of many: to lose weight and adopt more healthy living habits.

According to Goutham Rao, MD, Primary Care Physician at NorthShore, weight loss can be achieved through incremental behavior change. He provides some quick tips about healthy behaviors to help lose weight.

Healthy behaviors include:

  • Eat a balanced breakfast. Skipping breakfast encourages overeating later in the day.
  • Eliminate all sweet beverages from your diet and switch to water exclusively. (Sweet beverages include: fruit drinks, punches, regular soft drinks, fruit juices, sweetened iced tea, flavored milk, sports drinks and energy drinks).
  • Limit fast food consumption to no more than once per week. 
  • Incorporate about 15 – 30 minutes of physical activity into your daily routine (e.g. aerobics classes). Walking—even part of the way to work—is a good example.
  • Limit all non work-related screen time to no more than two hours a day. This includes computer, video games and TV. 
  • Eat meals as a family. Don’t eat in front of the TV; mindless eating promotes obesity.
  • Avoid snacks or meals just before bedtime (when energy is least needed).

What tips do you have to stay trim in 2012?

For more information about Childhood Obesity, please check out Dr. Rao’s book, Child Obesity: A Parent’s Guide to a Fit, Trim and Happy Child.

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