The Importance of Sleep to a Healthier You

Friday, May 24, 2013 10:48 AM comments (0)

sleepThe importance of a good night’s sleep can’t be overstated and not getting enough can lead to more than simply waking up on the wrong side of the bed.  Prolonged sleep deprivation can raise your risk for serious health problems like heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Sleep isn’t a waste of time; it’s an investment in your health.

The benefits of sleep are many. According to Thomas Freedom, MD, Neurologist and Program Director of Sleep Medicine at NorthShore, a good night’s rest can improve:

  • Your smarts. Sleep is essential to critical thinking and learning. Losing out a night’s rest impairs these processes, affecting attention span, problem-solving skills and alertness. Prolonged sleep deprivation takes a toll on long-term memory, too. It’s during your deepest sleep that the brain does its housekeeping, storing and consolidating learned information and long-term memories.
  • Your happiness. One sleepless night is depressing but multiple sleepless nights might be a symptom of depression. Insomnia and sleep disorders are strongly linked to depression and prolonged sleep deprivation can aggravate already existing symptoms of depression. Studies have shown that people diagnosed with depression were far more likely to sleep less than six hours a night.
  • Your looks. It turns out the fountain of youth isn’t a fountain at all. The key to healthy, youthful skin is plenty of rest. When you don’t get enough sleep, the body releases increased amounts of the stress hormone cortisol and excess cortisol can break down skin collagen— the protein responsible for supple, line-free skin. 
  • Your health. Chronic sleep deprivation is a contributing factor in a number of serious health problems, including heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Those who regularly fail to get enough sleep are at a higher risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure. Lack of sleep can also add to your waistline. Sleep loss is linked in an increase in appetite and cravings for high-carbohydrate and high-fat foods.
  • Your sex life. If the mood never strikes, your sleep schedule could be to blame. Sleep-deprived men and women often report less interest in sex. Lack of sleep leads to lower energy levels, higher stress levels and fatigue, which all have a negative effect on libido. To spend more time in the sack, spend more time in bed.

Remember that the amount of sleep required varies with each individual, but most adults need approximately 7-8 hours a night. 

Do you think you get enough sleep each night? Do you make sleep a priority?

 

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