Healthy Mother & Baby: Gestational Diabetes

Wednesday, March 25, 2015 2:40 PM comments (0)

gestational diabetesGestational diabetes develops during pregnancy, typically between the 24th and 28th weeks. Most women will experience some change in glucose levels during pregnancy due to fluctuating hormone levels. Gestational diabetes develops when glucose levels rise but a woman’s pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. Developing gestational diabetes does not mean a woman was diabetic prior to her pregnancy, however approximately 20% of women with gestational diabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes later in life.  Women with gestational diabetes must make lifestyle changes to ensure their health as well as their baby’s. 

Rebecca Jacobson, MD, Obstetrics/Gynecology, discusses when women should be screened and what changes an expectant mother should make after diagnosis:

Women are screened for gestational diabetes approximately 24-28 weeks into pregnancy. However, women who are at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes—risk factors such as obesity, previous instance of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes—will likely require earlier screening. 

It’s important to keep gestational diabetes in check to prevent complications that could affect your baby, such as excessive birth weight, increased risk of cesarean section, increased risk of birth trauma, premature birth, low infant blood sugar at birth, and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can also result in a baby’s death. 

Treatment options:

  • Monitor blood sugar. Expectant mothers diagnosed with gestational diabetes will likely have to monitor blood sugar upwards of four to five times a day—in the morning and after meals— to keep levels within a healthy range. 
  • Maintain a healthy diet. The right foods and portion sizes, as well as steering clear of sugary snacks and drinks, will help keep sugar levels in check and prevent excess weight gain during pregnancy. Women newly diagnosed with gestational diabetes should work with their doctors and a nutritionist to create a balanced diet plan with weight gain goals because weight loss is not recommended during pregnancy. 
  • Exercise regularly. Exercise is important during pregnancy both for mother and growing baby. Exercise lowers blood sugar levels because the body transports glucose into cells, which produces the energy for physical activity. Moderate-to-vigorous exercise, with a doctor’s permission, is recommended nearly every day of the week.
  • Supplement with medication. Changing one’s diet and regular exercise might not be enough to combat gestational diabetes. Some women will require additional treatment with medication, which can be administered orally or as an injection. 

Have questions about gestational diabetes or advice to offer other women newly diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Join our new online community The Parent 'Hood to start a conversation today. Click here to find out more. 

Comment

Tips for a Happy, Healthy Pregnancy After Age 35

Wednesday, June 05, 2013 12:42 PM comments (0)

pregnancyIncreasingly more women are waiting until later in life to start families. And while there are many benefits to postponing motherhood, there are some health risks that increase as a woman ages. 

What are the risks? Starting in their mid-30s, women face an increased risk for miscarriage, fetal chromosomal abnormalities, high blood pressure, gestational diabetes, placental abruption, preeclampsia, early labor and are more likely to require a cesarean. 

It’s important to remember that these are risks all women, no matter their age, face during pregnancy. While every woman’s pregnancy is unique, older moms-to-be often face some unique challenges. Knowing what challenges might arise and how to reduce your risk increases the likelihood you’ll enjoy a happy and healthy pregnancy.

Scott MacGregor, DO, Maternal-Fetal Medicine at NorthShore, shares his tips for staying healthy throughout your pregnancy: 

  • Talk to you doctor or midwife before getting pregnant. If you are older than 35 and thinking of starting a family, talk to your doctor or midwife about the current state of your health.  He or she can assess your personal risks and recommend certain lifestyle changes or evaluations to ensure you are at optimal health prior to getting pregnant. 
  • See your doctor or midwife early and regularly. As soon as you think you might be pregnant, see your doctor or midwife. The early stages are very important for any woman. Your doctor or midwife can assess your pregnancy and medical status in the early months and provide you with information to help guide you through the process.  Your doctor or midwife can also discuss your management plan and options during the pregnancy.
  • Take your vitamins. Again, this is important for any pregnant woman. Prenatal vitamins should contain at least 400 micrograms of folic acid. If you are not yet pregnant but are considering starting a family, start prenatal vitamins or folic acid now. Getting the recommended amount of folic acid before pregnancy and during the first trimester helps prevent birth defects. 
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices. Pregnancy is an excellent time to embark upon smart lifestyle choices. Moderate exercise—walking, swimming, yoga, stationary bike—for 30-45 minutes daily is encouraged. Make sure to maintain adequate hydration and avoid overexertion.  Cigarettes, alcohol and illicit drugs should be avoided.  Over-the-counter medications and herbal medicines should be avoided. 

Are you waiting until later to start your family? When did you have your first child?

Comment
× Alternate Text