Colorectal Cancer – Early Screening Can Save Lives

Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:30 AM comments (0)

colon cancerColorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in both men and women in the United States. However, if everyone over the age of 50 were regularly screened, it might be possible to reduce deaths associated with colorectal cancer by as much as 60 percent.

Many women believe that colorectal cancer is a disease that affects more men than women, so they might not be aware of or believe they need to follow current screening recommendations. National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month this March is the right time to spread the word that colorectal cancer affects men and women equally and that screening saves lives.

Joel Retsky, MD, Gastroenterologist, shares some important information about colorectal cancer everyone should know, men and women:

  • Your risk increases with age. More than 90% of colorectal cancer cases occur in those who are 50 or older. Everyone over the age of 50 should follow national screening guidelines and continue screening at regular intervals at least until 75 years of age.
  • You should not wait for symptoms. Colorectal cancer rarely causes noticeable symptoms in the early stages. Symptoms of colorectal cancer—bleeding from the rectum, change in bowel habits, noticeable weight loss—often do not appear until the cancer is advanced and more difficult to treat. Most colorectal cancers come from polyps, or abnormal masses, that grow in the inner lining of the large intestine. With screening, polyps can be removed before they even become cancerous.
  • Family history is important. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you may need to begin screening earlier, perhaps at 40 or even younger. You will also need to be screened more frequently than currently recommended by the national guidelines. 
  • Personal history is important. Some studies have shown that women who have had ovarian, uterine or breast cancer have a higher-than-average chance of developing colorectal cancer. Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are also risk factors. Talk to your physician about how these risk factors might affect the frequency of your screenings.
  • There are several screening options. There are many tests for colorectal cancer, including fecal occult blood test (FOBT), sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, virtual colonoscopy and barium enema. Colonoscopy is the most effective test for colon cancer screening. Talk to your physician about which screening option is best for you.


If you’re 50 or over and have never been screened for colorectal cancer, make National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month the month you schedule your first appointment.


Have you been screened for colorectal cancer?

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