Colon Cancer: Reducing Your Risk

Tuesday, March 25, 2014 12:46 PM comments (0)

Reducing riskThere are many risk factors for colon cancer that are beyond your control—being over the age of 50, family history of colorectal cancer, personal history of polyps, inflammatory intestinal conditions like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis. There are, however, risk factors you can mitigate by making some simple and some not-so-simple changes to your lifestyle. 

Susannah Spiess, MD, Gastroenterologist at NorthShore, encourages everyone to make these healthy lifestyle changes to help lower the risk for colon cancer: 

Eat a high-fiber, low-fat diet. Studies have shown that diets high in fat and lower in fiber may increase your risk for developing colon cancer. These same studies also indicate an increased risk for those who consume large quantities of red meat regularly. Shift the focus of your diet away from meat, particularly red meat, and give fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains top billing on your plate.

Get up and move. This doesn’t just mean 30 minutes of exercise a day. Get up and move throughout the day. An inactive, sedentary lifestyle can increase your risk of developing colon cancer. If you spend most of your day sitting behind a desk, stand up and move every 20 minutes or whenever possible. 

Lose weight. Changing your diet and increasing your activity level will work wonders on your waistline as well. Obesity significantly increases one’s risk for not only developing colon cancer but also dying from the disease if diagnosed.

Break the habit. It’s a terribly unhealthy habit. Smoking increases your risk for a number of serious health issues, from lung cancer and heart disease to stroke and, you guessed it, colon cancer. The time to break the habit is now.

Cut back. The excessive consumption of alcohol raises your risk for several types of cancers, including cancer of the colon and rectum. Monitor your daily and weekly consumption of alcohol and ensure that it is no more than 14 units of alcohol per week and no more than three in any single day. 

Get a colonoscopy. While adopting these lifestyle changes could reduce one’s risk for colon cancer, screening colonoscopy is the only proven method of preventing the disease.

Have you made an appointment to get your first colonoscopy? Find out more here

Dispelling the Myths of the Colonoscopy

Thursday, March 20, 2014 3:24 PM comments (0)

colonoscopyColon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, claiming nearly 29,000 men and women each year. It is surpassed only by lung cancer. Colon cancer also happens to be one of the most preventable cancers. Studies have shown that a colonoscopy can reduce the risk of developing and dying from colorectal cancer by 90%. A colonscopy can enable a physician to identify and remove polyps before they even become malignant. 

David Labowitz, DO, MPH, Gastroenterology at NorthShore, addresses some of the damaging myths about colonoscopy that discourage many from getting this lifesaving procedure when they should:

Myth #1: The “prep work” is terrible.
You do have to empty your colon before a colonoscopy. This is the hardest part of the exam, but the most important.  I always tell patients that without a good prep, it’s like driving through fog—you cannot see where you are going.  However, the prep does not have to be a terrible experience. The day before the procedure, you should stop eating solid food and consume only clear liquids; however, you can have more than just water. Incorporating variety—tea, Jell-O, sports drinks and broth—into your 24-hour clear liquid diet will help make it more bearable.

The most common complaint is the volume of colonoscopy prep electrolyte solution that must be consumed to clear the bowels. To make this easier, we actually split the drinking of the prep into two different time periods (the evening before and a couple of hours before the procedure).  This not only is an easier way for patients to accomplish the prep, but has been shown in national studies to be a better way to prep for the procedure.  Think about the prep this way: the cleaner your colon, the faster and easier the procedure the next day. Unfortunately, if your colon isn’t clear because you have failed to drink the solution, polyps and lesions could go undetected or the results could be inconclusive. Further, the procedure may need to be repeated. It’s all about doing it right the first time.

Expert Tips! Make the Prep a Little Easier 

  • Drink it all at once, as quickly as possible through a straw
  • Refrigerate it so it's nearly ice cold
  • Suck on a piece of hard candy or chew a piece of gum immediately after drinking the solution
  • Mix the solution with something like Crystal Light

Myth #2: The procedure is painful.
A colonoscopy is a very tolerable procedure. Further, it does not take very long and most of the time is completed within 20-30 minutes. Before the procedure begins, you will be given a sedative to help you relax. In fact, most patients will sleep through the entire procedure and wake up not remembering any of it. Those who remain awake during the procedure report nothing more than slight cramping or pressure in the abdomen, similar to the feeling of having a bowel movement. 

Myth #3: It’s embarrassing.
Our NorthShore gastroenterologists perform over 35,000 GI procedures each year—the majority being colonoscopies—so they have a lot of experience making sure patients are as comfortable with the process as possible. Patients can also make an appointment with their gastroenterologist before the procedure to meet face to face and ask any questions that will help them feel more comfortable. 

Myth #4: There is a high risk of complications.
Complications during or after a colonoscopy are very rare. The bottom line is your risk of developing colon cancer is far higher than your risk of suffering a complication due to a colonoscopy. It is, however, important to schedule your colonoscopy with a physician who is certified to perform this procedure. 

Myth #5: Colonoscopies aren’t necessary for women.
Colorectal cancer affects men and women in nearly equal numbers. It’s not a man’s disease; therefore, screening colonoscopies are for everyone. Women need to schedule their first screening colonoscopy starting at age 50, just like men. More than 90% of colorectal cancer is diagnosed in people who are 50 or older. Those with a family history of the disease and other risk factors—a history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), history of polyps, type 2 diabetes, obesity and smoking—might need to start screening early and undergo screening more often. Ask your doctor when you should begin screening.

For more information on colonoscopies and to make an appointment, click here

Spring "Clean" Your Diet: Clean Eating Guidelines and Benefits [Infographic]

Thursday, March 20, 2014 9:14 AM comments (0)

This year, spring clean your diet, too. "Clean" eating means to create a balanced diet of fresh, unprocessed foods with the central focus on fruits and vegetables. The health benefits of clean eating are many, such as possible weight loss and the reduction of one's risk for diabetes and some types of cancer, including colon cancer.

The experts at NorthShore University HealthSystem have created an infographic that illustrates the benefits of clean eating and breaks down the most important clean eating guidelines. Click on the image below to view the full infographic.

infographic image

Go Green: Your Colon (and Body) Will Thank You

Wednesday, March 06, 2013 1:52 PM comments (0)


ColonCancerAs the old adage goes, “You are what you eat.” When it comes to your health, this saying is true — eating healthier foods will make you feel better, have more energy and help you maintain your weight.

Many of the foods we eat—as tasty as they are—aren’t always the easiest for our system to digest. This is true for highly processed foods, and foods high in sodium, sugar, saturated fats and cholesterol. It’s not to say that, in moderation, we can’t enjoy some of these foods, but research has proven that a diet high in fresh food, especially green vegetables, may help prevent colon cancer.

Considering colon cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and women, it’s nice to know that a balanced, healthy diet may be the first step toward disease prevention. Yolandra Johnson, MD, Gastroenterologist at NorthShore, provides easy ways to work more greens and other vegetables into your daily diet:

  • Add chopped vegetables to your pasta sauces. Add chopped or shredded zucchini, carrot, peas, spinach or eggplant into either homemade or store-bought sauces. You’ll be adding extra flavor and more nutrients.
  • Blend it up. Smoothies don’t have to be made with only fruit. Consider mixing a more savory blend by adding in vegetables. Spinach is a great addition to fruit smoothies.
  • Eat a side salad with lunch or dinner. A salad is a great way to get an extra serving of vegetables, plus it will help fill you up before the main course. That’s good for your diet and for your waistline!
  • Choose ready-made options if you’re short on time. Canned and frozen vegetables can be just as nutritious as fresh ones. If you have limited time to prepare meals, go for prepared salads,  pre-chopped veggies, canned goods or frozen items. Remember, there’s no wrong way to add vegetables to your diet.
  • Snack on fresh vegetables instead of chips and other junk foods. Cucumbers, peapods, carrots, peppers and celery all make great snack items. Prepare small bags of these veggies for the week so they’re easy to grab and go.

What are some of your favorite dishes that include vegetables? What are some of your tricks for including veggies in your diet?

 

× Alternate Text