Breast Cancer – Not Just a Women’s Disease

Wednesday, October 03, 2012 12:58 PM

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and one fact many of us may not be aware of is that breast cancer can affect both women and men. Men, just like women, have breast tissue, thus making it possible to also develop breast cancer. Breast cancer is not very common in men, and most men who are diagnosed with it do not develop it until they are older (50 to 60 years of age). However, younger men can also develop breast cancer, making it very important to identify signs and symptoms. The incidence of breast cancer in men is very low. Yet, a strong family history of breast cancer, particularly in younger family members, increases the risk of breast cancer in men. In patients with a BRCA genetic mutation, the age of diagnosis is younger. If present, the lifetime risk of developing breast cancer in a man is approximately 6%.

David J. Winchester, MD, Breast Surgeon at NorthShore, identifies what men should look for to determine breast cancer:

  • A painless lump in the breast. This can be identified on a self breast exam.
  • Discharge from the nipple (may include bleeding).
  • Breast asymmetry.
  • Nipple retraction or deformity.

Breast cancer is often diagnosed at later stages in men. If you notice any of the signs listed above, plan to reach out to your physician for evaluation.

Are you surprised that breast cancer affects men? What other information would you want to learn about on the topic?

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