IRB12-2172-AM003 - Vitamin D Intervention Study In African Americans With A History Of Colon Cancer Or Colonic Adenomas
Aims:
  Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the US.  African Americans (AA) suffer disproportionately from colon cancer.  Possible causes for this include social, cultural and environmental factors, and differences in tumor biology and susceptibility alleles.  This study proposes to measure the effects of a dietary vitamin D intervention on intermediate biomarkers in African Americans with a history of colon cancer or colonic adenomas.
Diagnosis:
Colon Cancer or Colonic Adenomas
Principal Investigator:
Michael J. Goldberg, MD
Other Investigator:
Laura Bianchi, MD
IRB Approval Number:
EH13-195
Sponsor:
  University of Chicago
Contact:
  Boris Jancan, CCRP Clinical Research Associate at 847.570.1583
Open to Enrollment:
  Pending

Protocol #: NWU 06-8-01 - Polyethylene Glycol for ACF Reduction and Biomarker Modulation in Individuals with CRC Risk.
Aims:
 The purpose of this study is to determine whether the study medication, PEG (polyethylene glycol), can modify the risk of developing colon polyps or cancer. We will evaluate the levels of the molecules that are important in colon polyp formation and study whether PEG has an impact on this. The study medication PEG is widely used as a laxative medication for people who have constipation and is available over-the-counter (without prescription). In pre-clinical (animal) models, PEG has been noted to decrease development of colon tumors. This study is designed to see if PEG may be protective in humans. We will assess whether treatment with PEG will decrease the risk of colon cancer. The study medication PEG has not yet received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for reducing abnormalities in the colon or the risk of colon cancer.
Diagnosis:
Colonic Adenomas
Principal Investigator:
Laura Bianchi, MD
Other Investigator:
Michael J. Goldberg, MD
IRB Approval Number:
EH08-227
Sponsor:
  National Cancer Institute
Contact:
  Boris Jancan, CCRP Clinical Research Associate at 847.570.1583
Open to Enrollment:
  Yes

Spectroscopy of Blood Supply Changes in Early precancer
Aims:
  The purpose of this study is to see whether LSS analysis of normal colon tissue will enable us to determine who has colon polyps or cancers. In order to do these, during your colonoscopy the physician performing the colonoscopy will take six small biopsies from your colon and analyze them with LSS. Light-Scattering spectroscopy (LSS) is a novel technology in which light is shined on tissue samples and the reflected light is analyzed. This analysis can give insights into the molecular composition of the cells. We have used this technology to analyze animal tissue and found that in this experimental model, we are able to detect which animals may develop colon cancer.
Diagnosis:
Colon Cancer, Colonic Adenomas and Healthy Subjects
Principal Investigator:
Roy K. Hemant, MD
Other Investigator:
Michael J. Goldberg, MD and Laura Bianchi, MD
IRB Approval Number:
EH03-306
Sponsor:
  NIH
Contact:
  Boris Jancan, CCRP Clinical Research Associate at 847.570.1583
Open to Enrollment:
  Yes

Renewal (CA11257) - Spectral Markers for Early Detection of Colon Neoplasia
Aims:
  The purpose of this study is to help investigators develop a new method for the early detection of colon cancer. To prevent deaths from colon cancer, current efforts are focused on early detection largely through colonoscopy. However this approach is expensive and has a number of associated complications, leading to a desire for other methods of early detection. PWS (Partial Wave Spectroscopy) is a method of examining tissue. PWS technology shines light on the tissue sample. When the light hits the cell, the structure of the cell causes the light to scatter in different ways. Information about the tissue can be gathered from the way that the light is scattered. This study will look for changes in tissue samples from the inside of the rectum (the last part of the large bowel). The approach is based on the principle that patients who are at risk for colon cancer, colon cells are subtly abnormal. We believe PWS may allow us to identify these changes. We hope to identify cellular changes which may someday be useful in identifying subjects at risk of colon cancer. In this
Diagnosis: Colon Cancer, Colonic Adenomas and Healthy Subjects
Principal Investigator:
Roy K. Hemant, MD
Other Investigator:
Michael J. Goldberg, MD and Laura Bianchi, MD
IRB Approval Number:
EH09-524
Sponsor:
  NIH
Contact:
  Boris Jancan, CCRP Clinical Research Associate at 847.570.1583
Open to Enrollment:
  Yes

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