Mark Evan Gerber, M.D.

Mark Evan Gerber, M.D.

Mark Evan Gerber, M.D.

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Conditions & Procedures

Conditions

Acquired and Congenital Airway Problems, Acquired and Congenital Ear Problems, Airway Disorders in Children, Allergic Rhinitis, Cholesteatoma, Head and Neck Cancer, Otitis, Resonance Disorders in Children, Sinusitis, Sleep Apnea, Swallowing Disorders in Children, Voice Disorders in Children

Procedures

Adenoidectomy, Airway Endoscopy, Cholesteatoma Surgery, Endoscopic Sinus Surgery, Head and Neck Surgery, Laryngeal and Tracheal Reconstruction, Myringotomy and Tubes, Ossicular Chain Reconstruction, Pediatric Otolaryngology, Tonsillectomy, Tympanoplasty

General Information

Gender

Male

Affiliation

NorthShore Medical Group

Expertise

Pediatric Otolaryngology, Pediatric Laryngology

Academic Rank

Clinical Associate Professor

Languages

English

Board Certified

Education, Training & Fellowships

Medical School

Loyola University Stritch Schl of Medicine, 1989

Residency

University of Cincinnati Hospital, 1995

Fellowship

Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, 1997

Locations

A

NorthShore Medical Group

501 Skokie Blvd.
Northbrook, IL 60062
847.504.3300 847.504.3305 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.
B

NorthShore Medical Group

1000 Central St.
Suite 800
Evanston, IL 60201
847.504.3300 847.504.3305 fax This location is wheelchair accessible.

Insurance

Commercial Plans
  • Aetna Choice POS (Open Access) and POS II (Open Access)
  • Aetna Elect Choice EPO and EPO Open Access
  • Aetna Health Network Options
  • Aetna HMO (including Open Access)
  • Aetna Managed Choice (Open Access)
  • Aetna Managed Choice POS
  • Aetna Open Access Aetna Select (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Access Elect Choice EPO (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Access Managed Choice POS (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Open Choice PPO
  • Aetna Open Choice PPO (Aetna HealthFund)
  • Aetna Premier Care Network
  • Aetna QPOS
  • Aetna Select
  • Aetna Select (Open Access)
  • Beechstreet PPO Network
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - PPO Products
    Not Contracted Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Choice PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Advantage
    Verify PCP Participation
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield HMOI
  • Cigna HMO
  • Cigna LocalPlus
  • Cigna Open Access Plus (OAP)
  • Cigna Open Access Plus with CareLink (OAPC)
  • Cigna POS
  • Cigna PPO
  • Cofinity PPO (an Aetna Company)
  • Coventry Health Care Elect Choice EPO
  • Coventry Health Care First Health PPO
  • Galaxy Health PPO Network
  • Great West PPO/POS
  • Healthcare's Finest Network (HFN)
  • Humana - All Commercial Plans (including Choice Care)
  • Humana - NorthShore Complete Care
  • Humana/ChoiceCare Network PPO
  • Medicare
  • Multiplan and PHCS PPO Network (Including PHCS Savility)
  • NorthShore Employee Network I (EPO)
  • NorthShore Employee Network II (EPO Plus & CDHP)
  • Preferred Plan PPO
  • Three Rivers Provider PPO Network (TRPN)
  • Tricare
  • Unicare
  • United Healthcare - All Commercial Plans
    Not Contracted United Healthcare Core
    Not Contracted United Healthcare Navigate
Exchange Plans
  • Not Contracted Aetna
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield - PPO Products
    Not Contracted Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Choice PPO
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Blue Precision
    Verify PCP Participation
  • Not Contracted Coventry
  • Humana National
  • Land of Lincoln - All Products
  • Not Contracted United Healthcare Compass
Medicaid
  • Illinois Department of Public Aid (IDPA)
  • Illinicare ICP
  • Community Care Partners
Medicare Advantage Plans
  • Aetna Medicare (SM) Plan (HMO/Open Access HMO)
  • Aetna Medicare (SM) Plan (PPO)
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Medicare Advantage PPO Plan
    Effective 1/1/2015
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Advantage HMO
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Premier HMO-POS
  • Cigna-HealthSpring Primary HMO
  • Humana Gold Plus HMO
  • Humana Gold Plus PFFS
  • HumanaChoice PPO
  • United Healthcare - All Medicare Plans
Medicare Medicaid Alignment Initiative (MMAI) Plans
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Community
  • HealthSpring
  • Humana
  • Illinicare Health Plan
  • Meridian Complete

Publications

  • Endoscopic posterior cricoid split and costal cartilage graft placement in children.

    Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery 2013 Mar

    Authors: Gerber ME,
    Abstract
    To review a multi-institutional experience using endoscopic posterior cricoid split and costal cartilage graft (EPCSCG) placement in the management of pediatric bilateral vocal fold immobility (BVFI), posterior glottic stenosis (PGS), and subglottic stenosis (SGS).
    Case series with chart review.
    Tertiary medical centers.
    Review of all patients treated between 2004 and 2012 with EPCSCG placement in 3 academic and multispecialty group settings. The main outcomes measured include indications, complications, and outcome (need for additional procedures, decannulation rate).
    A total of 28 patients underwent EPCSCG. Age range at time of surgery was 1 month to 15 years (mean, 56 months). Overall, 25 of 28 were decannulated or never required tracheostomy, and 24 of 28 had adequate symptom control with mean follow-up of 25 months. Twenty-two patients had resolution of their symptoms without additional procedures. Sixteen patients had SGS in isolation or in combination with cricoarytenoid fixation, glottic stenosis, or vocal fold immobility. Decannulation and/or symptom control was achieved in 14 of 16. Three patients had isolated PGS or cricoarytenoid fixation with all achieving decannulation. Nine patients had isolated BVFI with 7 being able to achieve resolution of their airway symptoms, 5 without additional procedures.
    This descriptive series shows a consistent outcome in more than double the number of cases previously reported in the previously published series. We believe that EPCSCG is an important option to have in the management of pediatric glottis/subglottic stenosis and bilateral vocal fold immobility.
    PMID: 23307912 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Generation of consensus in the application of a rating scale to nasendoscopic assessment of velopharyngeal function.

    Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery 2012 Oct

    Authors: Tieu DD,
    Abstract
    To generate consensus ratings of velopharyngeal function on nasendoscopy (NE) with the goal of creating a video instruction tool.
    The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Study Group convened to identify NE segments to be included in an instructional video. Of 24 segments reviewed, 11 were selected based on the quality of the examinations and spectrum of closure patterns. Participating otolaryngologists independently rated NE segments using the Golding-Kushner scale. The participants then convened and rated each of the NE segments as a group. Thirty-nine members of the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology met and agreed with the group ratings, creating a consensus standard.
    Individual scores for palate and lateral wall motion showed high variability, ranging from 0 to 6 points difference from the consensus. Variability was also seen for the following qualitative findings: the Passavant ridge, aberrant pulsations, and dorsal palatal notch. The individual ratings are presented graphically to demonstrate the range of individual responses as well as to compare responses to the consensus ratings. No further changes were made to the proposed consensus ratings when reviewed by the larger group.
    Rating of NE evaluations of velopharyngeal function was variable among a group of pediatric otolaryngologists experienced in treating velopharyngeal insufficiency. These results highlight the need to develop a standardized method of reporting NE findings for velopharyngeal insufficiency. Despite this, consensus ratings were achieved that will facilitate development of a video instruction tool.
    PMID: 23069822 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Efficacy of microdebrider intracapsular adenotonsillectomy as validated by polysomnography.

    The Laryngoscope 2009 Jul

    Authors: Reilly BK,
    Abstract
    To evaluate the efficacy of microdebrider intracapsular tonsillectomy (MT) as a treatment for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and sleep disordered breathing.
    A retrospective study evaluating polysomnogram outcomes for 26 patients who had undergone MT by a sole surgeon (M.G.) for OSA.
    Chart review of patients who underwent polysomnograms pre- and post-adenotonsillectomy. This study represents a single pediatric otolaryngologist's experience at two tertiary care medical centers (Children's Memorial Hospital and Evanston Hospital) in the greater Chicago area.
    Statistically significant improvement of both the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and apnea index with P < .0001. All 26 children in the cohort had improved AHI scores following intracapsular tonsillectomy. Statistical analysis was performed using a P value < .05, which was significant.
    MT is an effective means of treating obstructive sleep apnea. Because of its favorable surgical outcomes and minimal morbidity, an increasing number of studies have found MT to be an excellent option for the surgical management of adenotonsillar hypertrophy in pediatric patients with OSA.
    PMID: 19405091 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Endoscopic posterior costal cartilage graft placement for acute management of pediatric bilateral vocal fold paralysis without tracheostomy.

    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 2008 Oct

    Authors: Thakkar K,
    Abstract
    Endoscopic posterior cricoid split with costal cartilage graft stabilization has previously been shont to allow for glottic/infraglottic expansion in children with long standing vocal fold paralysis. We report on an extension of this technique to use in the acute setting in the management of acute BVP in children with acute upper airway obstructive symptoms.
    PMID: 18691770 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Marble in the right main-stem bronchus: management.

    Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery 2003 Feb

    Authors: Costello JM,
    Abstract
    Plastic bronchitis is a condition in which large, bronchial casts with rubber-like consistency develop in the tracheobronchial tree and cause airway obstruction. We describe a 4-year-old girl who had Fontan physiology and who developed plastic bronchitis and report for the first time the use of aerosolized tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of this condition. The literature is reviewed with emphasis placed on the occurrence of this disorder in patients with single ventricle physiology.
    PMID: 12601330 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Histological insight into the pathogenesis of severe laryngomalacia.

    International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology 2001 Oct 19

    Authors: Chandra RK,
    Abstract
    To correlate clinical and histological findings in patients with laryngomalacia who required surgical intervention.
    Retrospective study of all patients undergoing supraglottoplasty by a single surgeon (MEG) for severe laryngomalacia between October, 1999 and November, 2000.
    Nine patients were identified, of which seven had clinical evidence of GER. Seven patients had co-existing abnormalities or delays of neuromuscular development including seizure disorder, agenesis of the corpus callosum, obstructive sleep apnea, primary aspiration, a history of apparent life-threatening events, and craniosynostosis. Varying degrees of subepithelial edema and significant dilation of the subepithelial lymphatics were noted in all specimens. Submucosal inflammation was minimal to mild, and intraepithelial inflammation was rare to absent in all sections. No submucosal gland hyperplasia was seen in the samples from any patient. Two specimens contained cuneiform cartilage, both of which were histologically characterized as fibrocartilage.
    In this series, the histopathology of tissue excised during the treatment of severe laryngomalacia was dominated by submucosal edema and lymphatic dilation. Further study is needed to investigate comorbidities that may contribute to the need for intervention in children with laryngomalacia.
    PMID: 11576629 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Heterotopic neuroglial tissue causing airway obstruction in the newborn.

    Archives of otolaryngology--head & neck surgery 2001 Aug

    Authors: Behar PM,
    Abstract
    Heterotopic neuroglial (brain) tissue is a rare cause of airway obstruction in newborns. Fewer than 30 cases have been reported in the English literature. Brain heterotopias can mimic more common congenital anomalies of the head and neck.
    To review our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of children with heterotopic pharyngeal neuroglial tissue.
    Case series.
    Tertiary care children's hospital.
    Four newborns with airway obstruction caused by heterotopic neuroglial tissue.
    All patients were infants (3 full-term girls and a 32 weeks' gestation boy) who had airway obstruction in the newborn period. All patients underwent preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a heterogeneous mass involving the pharynx, neck, and parapharyngeal space. Bony deformities of the skull base and mandible were present in all patients, although intracranial connection was absent. Multiple surgical procedures were performed in all 4 patients. Tracheotomy was performed in 2 patients, gastrostomy tube placement was required in 3, and a nasopharyngeal tube was used in 1. Combined cervicofacial and transoral approaches were used for resection, preserving vital structures. Histopathologic evaluation revealed mature glial tissue and choroid plexus-like structures.
    Heterotopic neuroglial tissue must be considered in the differential diagnosis of airway obstruction in the newborn. Management is surgical resection, with attention to vital structures and function-analogous to surgery for lymphangioma. Multiple surgical procedures might be necessary in the treatment of these patients.
    PMID: 11493213 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Tracheal surgery in children: an 18-year review of four techniques.

    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery : official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 2001 Jun

    Authors: Backer CL,
    Abstract
    Review the short- and long-term outcomes of a single institution experience in infants with congenital tracheal stenosis, comparing four different operative techniques used from 1982 through 2000.
    Hospital and clinic records of 50 infants and children who had surgical repair of congenital tracheal stenosis secondary to complete tracheal rings were reviewed. Age at surgery ranged from 7 days to 72 months (median, 5 months, mean 7.8+/-12 months). Techniques included pericardial patch tracheoplasty (n=28), tracheal autograft (n=12), tracheal resection (n=8), and slide tracheoplasty (n=2). All procedures were done through a median sternotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass. Seventeen patients had a pulmonary artery sling (35%), and 11 had an intracardiac anomaly (22%).
    There were three early deaths (6% early mortality), two after pericardial tracheoplasty and one after autograft. There were six late deaths (12% late mortality), five after pericardial tracheoplasty and one after slide tracheoplasty. Length of stay (median) was 60 days (pericardial tracheoplasty), 28 days (autograft), 14 days (resection), and 18 days (slide). Reoperation and/or stent placement was required in seven patients (25%) after pericardial tracheoplasty, in two patients (17%) after autograft, in no patients after resection, and in one patient (50%) after slide tracheoplasty.
    Our current procedures of choice for infants with congenital tracheal stenosis are resection with end-to-end anastomosis for short-segment stenoses (up to eight rings) and the autograft technique for long-segment stenoses. Associated pulmonary artery sling and intracardiac anomalies should be repaired simultaneously.
    PMID: 11404130 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
  • Role of laryngoscopy, dual pH probe monitoring, and laryngeal mucosal biopsy in the diagnosis of pharyngoesophageal reflux.

    The Annals of otology, rhinology, and laryngology 2001 Apr

    Authors: McMurray JS,
    Abstract
    There is no standard for determining significant pharyngoesophageal reflux. This prospective blind comparison study compared dual pH probe studies, direct laryngoscopy, and mucosal biopsy in children without symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux who underwent airway evaluation. Significant reflux to the lower esophageal probe did not correlate with statistical significance with reflux to the upper probe. In this group of asymptomatic patients, a positive lower pH probe finding did not correlate with upper or lower esophageal mucosal inflammation. Eosinophilia in the esophageal mucosa is diagnostic of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and was seen in 5 of the laryngeal biopsies. A weak correlation was seen between positive findings at laryngoscopy and positive posterior cricoid biopsy in this group. There may be no consistent way to predict significant pharyngoesophageal reflux in asymptomatic patients. Single-probe pH testing will not predict significant pharyngoesophageal reflux with mucosal changes. Laryngoscopy and upper pH probe findings only weakly correlate with significant histologic findings. Laryngeal and posterior cricoid biopsy may be the only sensitive test for mucosal injury. Clinical trials of empiric antireflux therapy should be used to determine whether the laryngeal changes seen in these patients are reversible.
    PMID: 11307903 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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Mar 2014

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